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THE NORTH SHORE COUNTRY 
DAY SCHOOL 



310 Green Bay Rd. Winnetka, IL 




DEDICATION 



The senior class, when asked to "vote for 
the teacher who has affected your Person 
the most," elected Mr. William Goss. The 
result of the vote was no surprise; Mr. Goss 
is an extraordinary person. 

As a teacher, Mr. Goss performs 
memorable feats to keep his student 
smiling. Some may remember him as "the 
guy covered with fluffernutter" {that day 
he was trying to emphasize the 
importance of clear directions by having 
his students instruct him in the making of a 
peanut butter and fluffernutter sandwich) 
or as the human "happy atom" (crouching 
atop and leaping from his desk, no less); 
others may recall his dedication to round 
dancing or to the annual "alcoholism" 
interim week. 

It is such dedication to each student, 
however, that makes Mr. Goss the 
exceptional instructor he is. In class, his 
communication is directed — though often 
wordlessly so — to each individual class 
member. When not in class, Mr. Goss can 
usually be found giving extra instruction. 
"Non-chemists" among his students are 
appreciated for their other realities, yet 
challenged to explore science through him 
in ways they did not previously believe 
themselves capable of. Mr. Goss looks at 
his students as valuable people, not as the 
grades they produce in class. Each one 
represents to him an egually worthy mind 
in need of the challenge and support he 
gives in abundance. It is with warmth and 
appreciation that the senior class 
dedicates the 1983 Mirror to Mr. William 
Goss, a man whose impact shall not soon 
be forgotten. 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Special Events 
The Arts 
Athletics 
Organizations 
Faculty 
Lower School 
Middle School 
Upper School 
Advertisements 




MIRROR STAFF 



EDITOR 


Andrew Barr 


A PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF 


Jim Block 


LAYOUT 


Murph Henderson 




Apur Patel 
Tory Piatt 


COPY 


Seemi Ghazi 




Chris Seline 


PHOTOGRAPHY 


Steven Goldin 
Nelson Repenning 


BUSINESS STAFF 


Alan Blumberg 

Kathy Gentles 

Caroline Kullberg 


BUSINESS 


Jon Schwarz 




Alison Rosen 


LAYOUT STAFF 


Sarah Britt 


ART STAFF 


Carol Janson 




Budge Cooper 
Jennifer Hunter 

C<-\r»\/n Mowonhni ico 


SPORTS STAFF 


Chris Charnas 
Peter Karmin 



Cheryl Rickel ADV | SO r 



John Almquist 



C< 



Jason Smith 






ALISHA BETANCOURT- 
MULLEN 



MICHAEL CONROY 



ELISSE GHITELMAN 



NEW TEACHERS AT NORTH SHORE 



What I have Found at NSCDS: 

Beautiful campus 

Pride in the school 

Friendly faculty and students 

Happy smiles and greetings 

Faculty and students are in tune with each other. 

An eagerness to learn 

A willingness to help each other 

A relaxed and positive learning environment 

Mutual respect for all ages 

It's a fun place to be 

I'm never too old to look through the eyes of a child 

I'm so happy to be here! 

— Mrs. Betsy Ulbrich 



My impression of North Shore? BONZAI! 
— Mary Roden 




In response to your note, 
here are two quotes 
which I like quite a lot. 
They constantly serve to 
keep the proper perspec- 
tive on my profession. 

He who can, does. He 
who cannot, teaches. 
— G.B. Shaw 

Teenagers, remember: If 
your counselor were 
working up to his poten- 
tial, he wouldn't still be in 
High School. 

— Fran Leibowitz 

Michael Conroy 






MARY RODEN 





BETH FOSTER 



JENNIFER PLISKA 




SARAH OPDYCKE 






ALISHA BETANCOURT- 
MULLEN 



MICHAEL CONROY 



ELISSE GHITELMAN 



NEW TEACHERS AT NORTH SHORE 



What I have Found at NSCDS: 

Beautiful campus 

Pride in the school 

Friendly faculty and students 

Happy smiles and greetings 

Faculty and students are in tune with each other. 

An eagerness to learn 

A willingness to help each other 

A relaxed and positive learning environment 

Mutual respect for all ages 

It's a fun place to be 

I'm never too old to look through the eyes of a child 

I'm so happy to be here! 

— Mrs. Betsy Ulbrich 



My impression of North Shore? BONZAI! 
— Mary Roden 




In response to your note, 
here are two quotes 
which I like quite a lot. 
They constantly serve to 
keep the proper perspec- 
tive on my profession. 

He who can, does. He 
who cannot, teaches. 
— G.B. Shaw 

Teenagers, remember: If 
your counselor were 
working up to his poten- 
tial, he wouldn't still be in 
High School. 

— Fran Leibowitz 

Michael Conroy 




MARY RODEN 



BETH FOSTER 




JENNIFER PLISKA 




SARAH OPDYCKE 






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MORNING EX 









10 






Morning Exercise, better known as Morning Ex., Mex, and 
other names, innumerable and unmentionable, is 
probably the most revered of North Shore traditions. 
Although students occasionally spend Morning Ex 
snoozing, brushing up on French vocab, or rummaging 
through pockets to find 50c for the post-assembly donut 
sale, all appreciate the community spirit inspired during 
these half-hours when the entire school comes together. 

Among the memorable Morning Ex's 82-83 were: 

The first: The Headmaster traditionally welcomes students 
and faculty back to school by reading a 
fairy tale. This year Mr. Hall selected "White 
Wave," the story of a Japanese fisherman. 

The traditional: As in years past, Morning Ex's were 

devoted to the Halloween Parade, The Lower 
School X-Mas Program, and the Santa 
Clause Party. 

The most mind-blowing: The lyrics and music in The 
Organic Theatre Company's operettic 
production of "Dead Trees" evoked a 
cosmic aura of spiritual consciousness among 
those in the auditorium. Our favorite lyrics: 
"Dead trees, fall on your knees, Yaa ya ya 
yaa yaa ya ya ya ya." 

The rosiest: Alison Rosen blushed her way through a 
spectacular Morning Ex on her summer in 
France. Especially noteworthy were the 
comments, "This is Les Invalides which houses 
Napoleon's tomb . . . This is the hall in Les 
Invalides which houses Napoleon's tomb . . . 
This is the chamber in the hall in Les Invalides 
which houses Napoleon's tomb . . . This is 
Napoleon's tomb!" 

The most inspirational: The Lower School presented a 
multi-media program in honor of Martin 
Luther King's birthday. King's life was 
depicted through slides, acting, and tapes of 
his "I have a dream" speech. At the end of 
the presentation, everyone joined in singing, 
"We Shall Overcome," the theme song of 
the Civil Rights movement. 

The most musically satisfying: Whether or not one 

attended the evening performance, the Diller 
St. Theater's Morning Ex preview of 
Clairseach, an Irish folk group, was an 
unforgettable musical experience. 

The most hilarial: The Latin students presented their 
version of "Ferdinand the Bull," in which 
Ferdinand's mother (Alison Rosen) mooed, 
Ferdinand ( (Jeff Swanson) ate flowers, and 
bullfighter (Peter Karmin) cried. 



HOMECOMING 1982-83 










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NORTH 
SHORE 

STUDENTS 
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BOOGIE! 






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John ("Ace") Park, Louisa 
("Flaps") Bornstein, and prize 
winner Nadia (What can we 
say?) Nagib (above left) are 
only three of the students who 
geared up for the annual 
costume dance. Despite the 
presence of several pieces of 
Dirty Laundry (remember Don 
Henley?), a mob of terrorists, 
and numerous Robert 
Redfords, Mark Bransfield took 
the boys' prize for best 
costume with his rendition of 
Mr. Toga (or was it Miss 
America?), as shown in the 
stairway shot. Thanks to 
instruction by phys ed 
instructors Kathleen Keefe and 
Mac McCarty, the students did 
not only look pretty at the 
dance; they could BOOGIE — or 
did they cha-cha? 



15 



WORK DAY 1982-1983 



Did you ever notice how much pointing 
Mr. Freisem does on work day? — J. Almquist 







16 




THE LOWER SCHOOL 
CHRISTMAS PROGRAM 



"What is the meaning of 
the season?" asked the 
children, and they trav- 
elled far and wide, all the 
way to the land of schol- 
ars and back, to find the 
answer. No one along the 
way could tell them. Dur- 
ing the night an angel 
visited them bringing 
beautiful visions into their 
dreams. Upon awakening 
the children understood 
the spirit of the holidays. 







18 




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SANTA CLAUS P 

A 
R 
T 
Y 



On Friday, December seventeenth, Santa "E.L." Claus 
visited North Shore. Bad weather over Syracuse, New 
York, had thrown his schedule off, but he still took time 
out to enjoy round dances presented by North Shore stu- 
dents and faculty members and Caroline Kullberg's 
reading of Twas the Night Before Christmas. "I'll be back 
next year!" he promised. "That is, on the condition that I 
may do the Hokey-Pokey with the kindergarteners and 
seniors again!" 









HO, HO, HO! 



AUCTION '83 



Recently, subtle changes have crept 
upon the North Shore campus. 
Students are mystified by the 
appearance of storm windows, 
carpeting and shrubbery around 
school. Such improvements, however, 
do not materialize from thin air. They 
are the product of long hours put in 
by the Women's Board of NSCDS. 
Although these dedicated women 
work hard all year round, they 
concentrate their efforts towards the 
annual auction in February. 

Auction '83 was a tremendous 
success. The seniors turned out in full 
force to man the coatcheck, display 
auction items and munch on 
roastbeef sandwiches in the 
homeroom between shifts. Despite 
competition from memorable 
modeling moments including Shawn 
McKeon in mink, Andrew Barr in a 
plastic fireman's hat, and Jeremy 
Goldberger on an exercycle, the 
highlight of the evening was the 
announcement that George Mitchell, 
Bob Beerheide, Jean Talley, Jackie 
Melissas and Carol Radloff jointly won 
the $10,000 raffle. 

The funds raised in the auction will 
help to close the gap between each 
student's tuition and the actual price 
of a North Shore education. Thanks 
should go to the Women's Board for 
all of their efforts! 





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THE 
DILLER 

STREET 
THEATER 



24 





Roger Shipley— Head honcho and 
the guy with an answer or an ex- 
pletive to fit any occasion. 




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The Corky Siegel Band 



25 



FALL PLAY 

The student body filed into the auditorium slowly, 
wondering how well they liked the prospect of 
sitting in silence for two hours. Suddenly Tillie (alias 
Jennifer Hunter) sat wide-eyed in a corner of the 
apron. Thoughts of gamma rays raced through 
her eager mind; suddenly, too, the audience was 
eager — eager to see the rest of The Effect of 
Gamma Rays on Man and the Moon Marigolds. 

Mama (Liz Wainwright) was the next character 
introduced. An outspoken woman incapable of 
accepting her daughter Tillie's successes, Mama 
shone as a domineering, desperate, and 
occasionally comic character. Mama bitterly 
occupied herself by "caring for" Nanny (Debbie 
Pinsof), a lovably silent old woman who served as 
the brunt of many jokes. Tillie's sister, Ruth (Katie 
Geyer), showed many facets of her personality; 
by tripping hysterically down the steps and by 
begging for a soon-to-be-chloraformed rabbit, 
Ruth shocked the audience into realizing the raw 
pain that resided beneath her mask of snobbery. 

The student body filed out of the auditorium, 
murmuring softly and wondering how they could 
have doubted the magic of Marigolds. 

— Murph Henderson 





26 




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NSCDS ARTWORK 







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VAUDEVILLE 

Vaudeville '82 was unfortunately reduced to the 
status of a Morning Ex, but the performers did not 
let this obstacle stand in their way. Each of the 
musical acts filled the auditorium with a certain . . 
"Je ne sais quoi." 

The tunes in Vaudeville ran the gamut from 
Beethoven to contemporary (that is, written by 
Michael Bransfield) rock. On a different note, one 
unidentified emcee seemed to touch the very 
heart of drama with his striking rendition of "The 
Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner." 

Vaudeville '83 was different, and everyone knew 
it. The extravaganza gained footing on a zenith 
where man was, perhaps, not meant to venture. 
They said it couldn't be done, but it was. They 
said it wouldn't work, yet it did. 






30 




1. THE BAND 

2. SANGERBUND 

3. NICOLE JOHNSON 

4. COURTNEY WILLIAMS 
DEBBI GOLDBERG 

5. MIDDLE SCHOOL 
ENSEMBLE 



MOMENTS 

NOBODY'S PERFECT 

CELLO PIECE 

16 GOING ON 17 



CORNER OF THE SKY 

6. LAURIE REAGAN OUT HERE ON MY OWN 

7. JENNIFER SCHECHTER ADUIEU 

8. SEEMI GHAZI ALBATROSS 

9. THE BAND GOOD LOVE 

"Hit it, Shellie!" 







31 



OPERA REHEARSALS 







We shall not cease from exploration, and 
the end of all our exploring will be to 
arrive where we started and know the 
place for the first time. 

— T.S. Eliot 

(via Carol Radloff) 



32 




Raising The Sails On The H.M.S. Pinafore 




It would be very easy for one to write words 

describing opera rehearsals, yet these thoughts 

would fail to capture the true flavor of that which 

is "opera". Perhaps these cast members' quotes 

will explain what really goes on behind the 

scenes: 

John Parks — "How many steps do you want me to 

take?" 

Mrs. Radloff— "Oh no! It's time!" 

Marc Peters — "I quit! I can't take this any longer!" 

Mr. Shipley— "Are you on crew? No? Then get off 

the set!" 

Seemi Ghazi— "Watch that hand, buster!" 






33 



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North Shore gunning 
for football playoff spot 



Will North Shore Country Day's football 
team nab a berth in the Class LA state 
playoffs? Stay tuned. 

"If we can win this Saturday (against 
Lake Forest Academy), I'd say we're wor- 
thy of playing in the state tournament," 
said Raider coach Mac McCarty, whose 
team is 5-2. 

The Raiders kept their slim hopes alive 
with a 27-0 whipping of Wheaton Christian 
Saturday in West Chicago. Dave Dewoskin 
opened the scoring when he grabbed a 30- 
yard touchdown pass from Mitch Tyson in 
the second quarter. 

North Shore didn't score again until the 
final stanza, when Ron Saslow tallied on a 
14-yard run. Tyson then sprinted 51 yards 
for a touchdown. Chris Wussler recovered 
a fumble and went 10 yards for the con- 
test's final score. 

"The first half was even," McCarty 
said. "They were playing a' spirited game 



and we weren't. "But the kids thought we 
weren't getting any calls and they got 
angry in the second half." 

Saslow led North Shore's ground attack 
with 84 yards on 10 carries. The Raiders 
rushed for 203 yards, while Tyson com- 
pleted 10-of-20 passes for 109 yards. 

"I think this team is very close in ability 
to the team that went to the state semi- 
finals (in 1979)," McCarty said. "We'd 
make a good showing if they took us." 

That's a big "if." "Nobody even knows 
we play," McCarty continued. "Because 
we're an independent, no coach will vote 
for us. They'll vote for teams in their 
league, even though we've beaten all the 
nearest 1A schools." 

Before it. can even be considered for a 
postseason berth, Country Day must tri- 
umph at winless Lake Forest Academy. 
The regular-season finale commences at 2 
p.m. Saturday. 



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UPPER SCHOOL FOC: 



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Front: M. Peters, J. Park, T. Miller, 
E. Lunding, M. Bransfield, P. 
Karmin, R. Snyder, D. Howland, 
D. DeWoskin, C. Olson Back: M. 
McCarty, L. Davis, M. Bransfield, 
S. Murphy, J. Swanson, R. Ghazi, 
P. Westhead, T. Schneider, R. 
Hannah, R. Saslow, C. Wussler, J. 
Theiss, D. Brown, F. Ballesteros, K. 
Park, B. Gritfin, M. Reinsdorf, E. 
Almquist, M. Tyson, J. Bach 









$?§£ 






MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL 



Middle School football was more than just "the required fall sport;" 
this was a sport that brought out the best and worst in people. 
Players learned that winning did not always come first. If the team 
gave its best effort and played a good game, there was an inner 
feeling of having contributed to the team. Players learned that no 
one person supported the team; everyone needed each other — 
there was a feeling of importance when on the field, a sense of 
duty to do one's job so someone else could do his. Everyone tried 
more than one position. The individual, having played all positions, 
knew his strengths and weaknesses and how the team functioned 
as a whole. There was a strong bond of respect between 
teammates. Everything that was done well in a game was ac- 
knowledged with enthusiasm and support. 

Statistically speaking, we were definitely not the best. Yet we were 
a team: a bunch of people who learned how to work together, a 
bunch of people who had confidence and were willing to have 
their "all" in a game. That is a good team! 




Joel de La Fuente 



38 





MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL 1st row (l-r): 
Mr. Casper, L. Welsh, S. Saslow, B. 
Dole, M. Lickerman, K. Nagib, C. 
Peruchini, J.B. Opdycke, J. Hayes, Mr. 
Bach 2nd row: B. Bach, J. Jacobson, J. 
Pierchala, C. Davis, E. Kerr, B. 
Hasenstab, T. Nikaldoh, C. Fisher 3rd 
row: A. Brown, D. Bloedorn, D. 
Hoffheimer, J. P. Hamm, M. Fisher, F. 
Scott, J. de La Fuente 





39 



Who are those masochistic girls sprinting nine times 
around the North Shore field? What kind of sadism 
gets them out there every day for bruised knees, 
shin splints and near-concussions? How do they 
derive pleasure from an activity that requires very 
few clothes in very cold weather and very 
abundant rain? 

Those girls are the dedicated members of the North 
Shore Raiders' field hockey team: a group who 
discovered, during their 1982 season, that they have 
a talent for the game of hockey, regardless of the 
pain or weather they must brave in order to play. 

The hockey team got a taste of the good fortune 
that awaited them at the Deerfield Invitational 
Tournament in early September. The Raiders beat 
ever-mighty Elgin 2-0 and surprised New Trier by 
letting in a mere two goals. The first league game 
brought yet another victory; despite the rain, the 
Raiders beat Latin 8-0, with goals by Cheryl Rickel, 
Sonya Newenhouse, Nadia Nagib, and Michelle 
Griffin. 

Alison Rosen, who joined Jackie Scott as a first team 
all-conference player, did the Raiders proud when 
she scored on the final penalty stroke against 
Barrington later in the season. The game thus ended 
in a tie after an overtime and three sets of flicks. 

Team spirit shone for the state tourney game against 
Oak Park on October 27th. Despite a strong second 
half, the Raiders lost 3-0. The team and Coach 
Mickey were joyous upon discovering what a feat 
holding this high school to 3-0 had been; Oak Park 
won the state championship by the same score! 

What have those raiding hockey players learned in 
1982? It pays to B-E A-G-G-R-E-S-S-l-V-E! 








40 




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UPPER 
SCHOOL 
HOCKEY 



VARSITY front (l-R): A Peacock, C. 
Rickel, N. Nagib, B. Cooper, L. 
Schreiber, J. Scott back: H. Pollard, M. 
Henderson, S. Newenhouse, M. Wing, 
M. Griffin, L. Hustwayte, J. Hunter, W. 
Aggens 









JUNIOR VARSITY front (l-r): J. Heyman, L. Kandelman, L. Bartell, C. O'Malley, K. Geyer, 
C. Aggens back: K. Irvine, T. Grivas, S. Diller, L. Melhus, L. Bornstein 



41 



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A team— (Row 1) Molly Shotwell, Annie Aggens, 
Victoria Toyooka, Heather Utzinger, Amy Hall (Row 2) 
Candace Rondeau, Libby Peruchini, Kris Demetriou, 
Cindy Brennan, Elizabeth Stroll, Lauri Reagan. 




MIDDLE SCHOOL 
FIELD HOCKEY 



The Middle School field hockey team worked 
everyday from 2:30 to 4:00, running, practicing 
stick-work, and scrimmaging. If their win/loss 
record wasn't impressive, their enthusiasm was. 
For win or lose, the team always had plenty of 
spirit and tried hard to improve. The coaches 
Debbie McFall and Elisse Ghitelman were always 
encouraging and supportive. Both the team's skills 
and win/loss record improved this year. Field 
Hockey was hard work, but fun, and was one of 
the high points of the year. 

— Lisa McClung 




The Middle School field hockey team drew a 
large enthusiastic crowd. All three grades 
were well represented on both the "A" and 
"B" squads. Coach Debbie McFall and 
Assistant Coach Elisse Ghitelman were 
pleased with the progress made by all the 
girls in their basic hockey skills and game 
sense. 

— Elisse Ghitelman 




42 




B team — (Row 1) Andrea Nash, 
Karen Paul, Catherine Toyooka, 
Jenni Barr, Elizabeth O'Hara (Row 
2) Lisa McClung, Dina Healy, 
Kathy Karaganis, Nikki 
Demetriou, Katie Fink, Eden Hall, 
Andrea Spertus, Christy Robinson 





43 



It is impossible to judge a 
team's true merit by a mere 
record of wins and losses. To 
say that winning is everything 
is to strike at the very heart of 
competition. For thousands of 
years men have pitted 
themselves against each other 
in the form of athletic battle, 
and quite frequently the losers 
return for a second chance. 
Okay, maybe I wouldn't be 
spitting forth all of this rhetoric 
if we had won a few more 
games. However, let us not 
dwell on our misfortunes, but 
let us point out the positive 
aspects of this year's team. 
This year's varsity squad had a 
team spirit that has been 
absent in recent years. Each 
player realized his 
responsibilities to himself and 
to the team, (continued) 




VARSITY 1st row (l-r): J. Block, J. Knupp, C. Charnas, E. Cha 2nd row: J. Smith, I. Flint, Z 
Marshall, H. Harbury, E. Chassin, R. Quayle 3rd row: B. Fowler, J. Krohn, A. Blumberg, I 
Kaplan, S. Goldin Absent: A. Barr, P. Harbury 






The scores of the games did 
indeed contradict the actual 
efforts put forth by all team 
members. The offense, led by 
leading scorer John Krohn, 
consistently harassed opposing 
(continued next page) 



UPPER SCHOOL SOCCER 




goalkeepers 
and 

frequently 
kept the ball 
out of our end 
of the field. 
The defense 
hung tough 
(even when 
the goalie 
picked fights). 
C. Charnas 
made first 
team All- 
Conference, 
and J. Smith, 
S. Goldin, and 
R. Quayle 
received 
Honorable 
Mentions. 






JV 1st row: Newman, Paige, Clement, Mathies, Lax, Repenning 2nd row: Gassel, 
Burnell, De La Fuente, Dole, Moore, Patel, DeWoskin, Wirtz 3rd row: Brown, Peters, 
DePatie Absenk-PefHW 




M 
I 

D 
S D 

O L 
C E 

C S 
E C 
R H 



O 



O 





46 





Opposite page— A Team: 1st row (l-r): M. 
McGrath, M. Newman, E. Reis, J. Reinsdorf, 
M. Grogan, P. Geyer, A. Richmond, Mr. 
Thornburgh. 2nd row: H. Statland, R. 
Schroeder, D. Pascal, M. Voegler, T. Stone. 



B Team 1st row (l-R): L. Williams, A. Grumet, T. Smith, A. Kogut, S. 
Tepper, T. Cekan, M. Ferris. 2nd row: W. Dietrich, C. Cooper, A. White, 
N. Wolpert, E. Schofer, R. Sutcliffe, C. Manly. 



The Middle-School soccer team was 
a fun and hopeful one for all of us. 
Mr. Smith and Mr. Thornburgh helped 
us improve our skills and have fun. We 
did practice drills to improve our skills 
and practice games to work as a 
team. The 6th graders won their first 
game, but the 7th and 8th graders 
lost theirs. Even though we didn't win 
the rest of our games, we had fun 
trying our best and being part of a 
team. 

— Matthew Newman 




47 






VARSITY 1st row (l-r): J. Saltoun, B. Ai, B. Conrad, S. McKeon, L. 
Wainwright 2nd row: A. Medvin, C. Williams, L. Gordon, P. Weisenberg, 
C. Janson 3rd row: K. Slater, M. Machimbarrena, H. Chandler, S. Ghazi, 
L. Wirtz, K. Fernstrom 4th row: A. Silver, D. Pinsof, M. Lechter 




GIRLS' VOLLEYBALL 



48 



BUMP, SET, SPIKE 



"Bump, set, spike!" was the motto that led the varsity volleyball team to victory this fall . . . well, 
to three victories. ANY victory was an improvement, considering we owed two of last year's three 
victories to forfeits. The season was not without highlights. We managed to bump, set, spike six 
times in the first game (more than we did in the entire 81-82 season). In a game at Mooseheart, 
Seemi, who was not watching when the ball sped toward her, flailed her arms and sent the ball 
from RB to Beth at LB (also unprepared) who sent it over in a wild attempt to remove her body 
from the path of the speeding projectile. Perhaps the greatest "win" was a comment made by a 
girl on the infamous slide-across-the-floor-on-their chests-to-get-the-ball Latin team: "You guys 
have really improved!" 



Credit for the improvement of the team is due to the following things: Linda, who never tired of 
making us "get down" with her spikes, Amy, who, despite the pressures of newly-married life, 
taught us to vry our repertoire with bump, set, dinks; the juniors and seniors who returned in spite 
of earlier complaints about required sports, and the large group of freshmen and sophomores 
who formed the promising JV team. The conditional promise of new cotton uniforms to replace 
our decaying polyester ones may also have pushed us toward a winning season. 

— Seemin Ghazi 



JUNIOR VARSITY 1st row (l-r): M. Kaplan, J. Hauselman, 
Mrs. Carver, S. Britt, C. Jesky 2nd row: M. Young, K. 
Stitt, T. Patel, C. Lincoln, E. Toyooka, S. McKeon, R. 
Andreou 3rd row: C. Mertz, S. Geist, K. Carlson 




OfTri 







MIDDLE SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL 




Lower, L. to R.: Courtney Williams, Jennifer Finnell, Jennifer Schecter, Lisa Cekan, Kristen Lawson 

Top, L. to R.: Rachel Drucker, Lisa Komylak, Laura Heinz, Laura Horton, Debbie Goldberg, Kerry Moore 





50 




The 1982-83 Middle School volleyball team 
consisted of 10 girls, who worked hard and 
tried their best, and their coach, Amy Deuble. 
They started out their season well by winning 
their first game, and won two more, later in the 
fall. They had alot of fun, both at practices and 
at games. Although they didn't always win, 
they always had team spirit. They'll do better 
next fall! 

— Jennifer Schecter 






51 




GIRLS' TENNIS 



Back: Coach Stanton, M. 
Abelmann, J. Dettmers, E. Wanberg, 
E. Heinz, J. Kottler, V. Fallarme. 
Front: S. Griffin, H. Schauer, T. Bach, 
K. Kuhns. 





52 





THAT'S THE WAY 
THE BALL BOUNCES! 

The 1982 girls' tennis team at N.S.C.D.S. con- 
sisted of girls with . . . well, varied talents. 
Practices began before the school year 
started, with the help of the new assistant 
coaches, Mr. Conroy and Val Fallarme. Mr. 
Stanton, as usual, provided immeasurable 
inspiration. The team worked harder than 
before and defeated Elgin and Morgan Park 
twice. The season ended with a record of 4 
wins and 6 losses. 

—Emily Wanberg 





■I . . ■ 



BASKETBALL 



Jay Bach had a dream: A Winning Basketball 
team. Not much to ask for. Some guys ask for 
cars, boats, planes, a Ginsu knife set, etc. Jay 
simply wanted a winning basketball team. 
December rapidly approached and the season 
was underway. 

December was certainly not marked with tank- 
topped gladiators (Raiders to be precise) 
trampling the enemy with vicious slam-dunks. No, 
this was not the case. On the contrary, December 
showed us players learning to adjust to their new 
teammates. The seniors had not worked with the 
juniors for two years. Everyone needed time to 
adjust. One may ask, "Just how long does a 
transition period last?" Well, for some teams this 
can mean years (ie. Chicago Cubs 38 years and 
counting). It is highly doubtful, however, that 
Raider basketball will be flushed down the toilet. 
The efforts put forth by this year's varsity squad 
showed that certain "will to live", that "never say 
die" attitude. One can only hope that younger 
generations will continue the belief that a winning 
team is possible. Let's not look back on our 
season with remorse or regret, yet let us regard it 
as a learning experience to be shared by all. 

— Jason Smith 




W 





54 




55 




MIDDLE SCHOOL 
BOYS BASKETBALL 










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56 





The Eighth Grade Basketball team is having a 
good season. Although there are more than 
fifteen people on the team, everyone usually 
gets a chance to play. During practices, 
teammates will help each other on the rules 
and other aspects of the game. At the current 
level of our game play, which we are quite 
happy with, our goal is to win at least half of 
our games. 

— Joel de la Fuente 



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BASKETBALL 







58 








There she goes, receiving a sly bounce pass from 
the point guard; with a fake left and a dribble 
between the legs, she leaps into the air with a 
swan's grace and finesse and slam dunks the ball. 
The defense is stunned and the crowd is going 
wild. This is just one of the many moves that a 
North Shore basketball woman can perform 
against opposing teams. 

The girls varsity and JV basketball teams are 
doing remarkably well this year. Captain Tracy 
Bach, with the aid of varsity coach Tom Doar, 
leads the team to victory. But look, there's a new 
face in the crowd. It's Michael Conroy, the new 
JV coach. You can always find him grinning on 
the sidelines during practices, watching the agony 
in the faces of the players (he knows darn well 
that he is responsible for this agony). Bach, Doar, 
and Conroy are quite demanding but you better 
believe it, guys, they get results. Those basketball 
women are awesome! 

— Budge Cooper 




59 



MIDDLE SCHOOL GIRLS' BASKETBALL 







60 




This year's basketball team was a 
hardworking one. After some 
rearrangement of the squads, the team 
finally settled down to some good, 
clean fun: basketball. We all worked 
hard and were supportive of to master 
such plays as the triangle and the press. 
These were two of the main plays in our 
game plan. 

We all had fun this year and are looking 
forward to playing again next year. 

— Lisa McClung 





61 














» 






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WRESTLING 



Two guys rolling around the 

floor inflicting pain on each 

other: need any more be 

said? 





62 




FALL SPORTS SCOREBOARD 



W-5 VARSITY HOCKEY 
NS 

8 Latin 

Elgin 

6 Francis Parker 

New Trier 

2 Lake Forest Academy 

4 Barrington 

4 Latin 

Lake Forest Academy 

Elgin 

2 Francis Parker 

Homewood Flossmoor 

1 Deerfield High School 
10 Lake Forest High School 

Oak Park (Tournament) 



W-4 VARSITY SOCCER 

NS 

2 Morgan Park 

1 Latin 

Elgin 

5 Northridge Prep 

Francis Parker 

Gordon Tech 

Lake Forest Academy 




L-12 
OPPONENT 




2 


Roycemore 







.■W % 


3 


Morgan Park 












Latin 


2 


■ 





Elgin 


7 






1 


Northridge Prep 


4 









Francis Parker 


6 






1 


Gordon Tech 


3 









Lake Forest Academy 


3 









St. Viator (Tournament) 


7 










. 


WL T 








J.V. HOCKEY 


4 1 1 


W-6 


VARSITY FOOTBALL 


L-2 


J.V. SOCCER 


14 


NS 




OPPONENT 


J.V. FOOTBALL 


1 





La Lumiere 


46 


GIRLS TENNIS 


4 6 


28 


Northwestern Military 





VARSITY VOLLEYBALL 


3 9 


27 


Kirkland Hiawatha 


14 


J.V. VOLLEYBALL 


2 8 


44 


Alden-Hebron 





M.S. HOCKEY (7&8) 


1 3 3 


14 


Mooseheart (Overtime) 


8 


M.S. HOCKEY (6&7) 


1 4 


21 


Gordon Tech 


26 


M.S. SOCCER 


7 


27 


Wheaton Christian 





M.S. FOOTBALL 


1 3 2 


54 


Lake Forest Academy 


6 


M.S. VOLLEYBALL 


2 3 



63 






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64 






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STUDENT COUNCIL 

Fighting for the "North Shore Party" and 
the maintenance of other traditions . . . 







In tree: S. Goldin, J. Schwarz, Back row: Mrs. Geyer, K. Park, 
E. Brooks, S. McKeon, L. Schrieber, J. Scott K. Carlson, Mr. 
Hall Front row: S. Cooper, B. Griffin, L. Gordon, S. Britt, P. 
Weisenberg, J. Dettmers, M. Bransfleld, In front: N. 
Repenning 



68 





MIDDLE SCHOOL FORUM 





Back: T. Smith, A. Spertus, N. 
Demetriou, V. Toyooka, K. 
Demetriou Front: J. De la Fuente, K. 
Nagib, E. Reis, E. Peruchini, L. 
Horton, J. Opdyke, Mrs. Hall, B. 
Hasenstab 





69 



NEWSPAPER 

Students have used the North Shore Country Day School 
Newspaper, christened The Observer by an anonymous 
contest winner, to voice many controversial issues. Rules, 
acts of the administration, and general student complaints 
have frequently graced the pages of The Observer. 

The commentaries and editorials may not have overjoyed 
the administration, but each has illustrated the students' 
greater interest in their newspaper this year. 

Being Editor has opened my eyes to the amount of work 
necessary to produce even a small publication like ours. 
Mrs. Geyer should be commended for the patience and 
courage she has demonstrated as faculty advisor. 

— Eve Brooks 



"■■■I-, 

"■■ -•£*£" 



"■■* 01' 

'■■ ■ ota 





Eve Brooks, Observer editor, poses for a casual 
candid. 



Chris Seline finds that being photography editor 
can take its toll on his sanity. 





OBSERVER 



After enduring the pressures of putting out an issue 
of The Observer, Andy Wolpert can be found thus 
paralyzed for days on end. 



Front row: E. Hlnes, R. Quayle, E. 
Brooks, C. Seline, J. Kotler, L. Farrell 
2nd: M. Abelmann, W. Aggens, S. 
Griffin, B. Griffin, S. Ghazi, Mrs. Geyer, 
E. Matthies, N. Golden, M. Wilder, N. 
Repenning 3rd: A. Wolpert, B. Fowler, 
P. Grivas, S. Murphy, P. Westhead, B. 
Ai, M. Bransfield, K. Moffat, J. Block 




70 



PROSODY 





Front Row: Seemi Ghazi, Carol Janson, Matt Wilder, Holly Schauer. 
Back Row: Mr. Conroy, Karen Slater, Bernie Ai, Amy Silver, Jackie 
Scott, Cathy O'Malley, Josie Saltoun, Jim Block. 





Some students may contribute to extra- 
curricular activities with half-hearted 
apathy until senior year, when, in college 
admissions essays, those activities become 
"meaningful personal experiences." Not so 
with the Prosody Staff. This exemplary 
group of students is selflessly devoted to 
discovering and encouraging North Shore's 
future Pulitzer Prize winners. 

Staff members read through approximately 
300 short stories and poems submitted by 
students in all 3 schools before selecting 
the best pieces for publication. Prosody 
also sponsors a contest in March, with 
prizes for the best poetry, prose, art and 
photography. Winning pieces are featured 
in a special section of the magazine. 



\ 




UPPER 

SCHOOL 

CHORUS 



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Back: T. Patel, K. 
Carlson, A. Patel, 
L. Bornstein, K. 
Irvine, J. Marrinson, 
B. Lax, E. Matthies, 
J. Swanson, P. 
DeWoskin, W. 
Aggens, N. Nagib, 
M. Machimarrena, 
B. Ai, B. Conrad, L. 
Schreiber, M. Pe- 
ters, T. Miller, J. 
Smith, J. Theiss, E. 
Chassin. 4th: E. 
Hines, M. Hender- 
son, A. Wirtz, J. 
DePatie, M. Wilder, 
G. Sentmenat, C. 
Olsen, J. Gassel, R. 
Hannah, J. 

Schwarz, S. Goldin, P. Harbury, C. Charnas, M. Reinsdorf, C. O'Hara, K. Moore. 3rd: L. Bartell, M. 
Young, C. Mertz, S. Britt, J. Heyman, E. Brooks, T. Grivas, S. Britt, B. Cooper, S. McKeon, L. Gordon, 
L. Hustwayte, M. Griffin, A. Peacock, H. Pollard, S. Janson, K. Kuhns, T. Bach, M. Kaplan, S. Diller, J. 
Hauselman, C. Lincoln, M. Wing. 2nd: Mr. Allison, H. Schauer, S. Griffin, L. Fleishman, M. Abelmann, 
S. Paige, A. Newman, N. Repenning, D. Burnell, R. Brown, S. Dole, B. De la Fuente, E. Almquist, K. 
Moffat. Front: L. Gorman, F. Cristol, J. Kotler, J. Dettmers, N. Golden, S. Ghazi, C. Janson, S. 
McKeon, C. Aggens, K. Reilly, E. Toyooka, C. O'Malley. 





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72 




Late-comers rush in, Mr. Allison pounds 
the podium, Mr. Rosenbaum pushes his 
g;asses up on his nose, and the mum- 
me-maws begin. It is Thursday 
afternoon, and upper school chorus is in 
session. 

Chorus provides any interested high 
schooler with the opportunity to throw 
his head back, open his mouth, and 
smile at the sound that bursts, forth, no 
matter what its pitch or guality. Whether 
the song is "O'er the Fields of Waving 
Purple," the Hallelujah chorus, or "A 
Maiden Fair to See" from HMS Pinafore, 
a listener cannot help but be impressed 
by the vibrating vocal chords of the 
Thursday afternoon chorus. 

— Murph Henderson 





73 






Can you imagine Charlie Brown without 
Snoopy, Laurel without Hardy, Reed without 
Lila? Of course not! So try, if you will, to 
picture North Shore without Mr. Vincent 
Allison, Jr. Why, if he weren't here, no one 
could ever leave morning ex! Just the sight 
of him sets even the most tone-deaf 
student a-hummin'. 



The Sangerbund is but one of the many 
groups he devotes himself to in his never- 
ending search for the perfect note. The 
trail leads him to such far-away places as 
Minneapolis-St. Paul and Edina, Minnesota, 
and St. Louis, Missouri. But, after countless 
miles travelled and even more 
notes missed, Mr. Allison 
continues to be the driving 
force behind the Sangerbund. 
For his dedication, we, Its 
members, thank him. 



Back: Mr. Allison, N. Repenning, C. 
Mertz, J. Smith, S. McKeon, P. Harbury, 
M. Machimbarrena, M. Peters, C. 
Janson, M. Bransfield. Middle: M. 
Henderson, G. Sentmenat, B. Cooper, 
J. Schwarz, L. Schreiber, S. Goldin, B. 
Ai, E. Chassln, S. Ghazi, K. Moore, 
Front: J. Hauselman, A. Patel, J. Kotler, 
D. Burnell, S. Newenhouse, B. Fowler, N. 
Nagib, C. Charnas, B. Conrad. 



SANGERBUND 




74 




CAMERATA 

Note: Absent in various 
and sundry pictures are 
Jason Smith and Carol 
Janson, Carol Janson 
(again), and (once 
more) Carol Janson. In 
the picture below, 
Jason, Murph, Seemi, 
and Mr. Allison are also 
absent. Thank you. 






Jason ("is it actually 7:45 a.m.?") Smith, 
Andrew ("no, I've really got it! Don't play it 
on the piano!") Barr, Budge ("but I've got 
basketball practice!") Cooper, Murph ("let's 
sing, all ready!") Henderson, Carol ("we 
seem to have some discrepancy in the 
soprano section!") Janson, Seemi ("circle 
that note!") Ghazi, and Mr. Vin ("I sing tenor 
here and bass starting on which note?") 
Allison are the Camerata Vocale. This group 
is often referred to as The Shefoolie Singers 
or "those people who dress up in tights and 
sing by candlelight without a piano." Though 
their rehearsals for performances at places 
such as Westmoorland Country Club and the 
North Shore auditorium range in tone from 
hapless to humorous, the Camerata never 
lose their sense of camaraderie. 

— Murph Henderson 



75 




STAGE CREW 



ROGER'S MERRY BAND 

As the smoke slowly curls about 
Roger's ears, an expression of 
amusement spreads across his face. 

"I meant, do it this way." He picks up 
a board. "But, Mr. Shipley, you said 
do it this way." 

"Do what I mean, not what I say," 
says he, tightening his grip on the 2" 
by 4". 

Thus explains the size of the stage 
crew: five, that is. When asked why 
they do it, members of Roger's merry 
band respond, "Well, it has something 
to do with a preference for pain." 
Stage Crew has been . . . fun. 
—Chris Seline and Beth Conrad 




CREW: Front: Beth Conrad, Kris Kuhns Back: Erik Almquist, Eric Matthies, 
Jessica Kotler, Liam Davis. (Absent: Chris Seline, wearing hat in other 
photo.) 




. . . . AND THE DANCE COMMITTEE 



DANCE COMMITTEE: Front (I. to r.): L. Gordon, J. 
Gassel, C Kullberg, B. Cooper, D. Pinsof, J. Hunter. 
Back: S. Goldin, B. Fowler, A. Blumberg, J. Block, J. 
Scott, S. Britt, S. Newenhouse, M. Bransfield, J. 
Knupp, E. Lunding, S. McKeon. 



76 





CLOSING UP 
THE GAPA 




Note: Alison Rosen, A GAPA officer and one 
of the finest female athletes at North Shore, is 
missing from all of these pictures. The MIRROR 
staff hopes she enjoyed her college trip. 




GIRLS' 

ATHLETIC 

PROJECTS ASSOCIATION 



Top: J. Dettmers, S. Ghazi Mid: D. Pinsol, L. Schreiber, N. Nagib 
Bot: J. Scott, C. Janson, B. Cooper, M. Griffin 



"I have cucumbers. Anyone for cucumbers?" 

"Where is everyone?" 

"In the lunchroom. I'll get them." 

"Pass the cucumbers." 

"Here they come. Where have you been?" 

"Sorry, forgot my lunch; just ran down to get a Tab." 

"That's O.K. Have a cucumber." 

So begins a typical Monday lunch with those GAPA 
girls. The elected representatives of the Girls' 
Athletic Projects Association spend 12:40 to 1:10 
once a week in Mickey's office planning fundraisers 
and social projects for the school and its immediate 
community. 

In 1982-83 GAPA volunteered as office workers at 
the Hadley School for the Blind, spent hours breaking 
the traumatic news of a hotdog shortage to hungry 
community rummage sale customers, sponsored 
aerobics classes (alias "Hours of abuse") with 
Kathleen, and organized a Daddy-Daughter 
volleyball game. GAPA also promotes school spirit 
by selling sweatshirts and mittens with the North 
Shore logo. Thanks should go to Mickey for all of her 
help. GAPA members wish for her happiness and 
success and will miss her. 

— Nadia Nagib and Seemi Ghazi 



77 



<&* 




SCHOOL 



O 



# 





Back row: C. Charnas, L. 
Gordon, J. Knupp, M. 
Bransfield, S. Cooper, E. 
Lunding. Front row: J. 
Dettmers. S. Goldin, J. 
Scott, J. Schwarz 







SCH 




78 






The Spirit Committee has existed at 
North Shore for two years. Our 
goals have been to inform the 
students about activities, games, 
plays, and other happenings 
around school. In addition, Spirit 
Committee sold North Shore Raider 
Jackets and Raider Duffle Bags and 
helped with the dances. 

The Committee helped to finance 
the 81/82 prom and has given 
money to other needy 
organizations. The Committee has 
worked hard to better the 
atmosphere at North Shore. At 
some time or another, just about 
every student has participated in 
some aspect of our committee. We 
like to consider it a successful 
organization that will live for years 
to come. 

Officers: Jon Schwarz, Andrew Barr, 
Eric Lunding, Jackie Scott, Sharon 
Cooper, Chris Charnas, Michael 
Bransfield. 

— Michael Bransfield 




m 

K 



79 



FORENSICS 



-Alarm should go off 
-Emerge from oblivion 
-Get in cold shower 
-Get dressed 
—Gulp down some o.j. 

and something made 

by Entenmann's 
-Drive through the pitch 

blackness and cold to 

get teammates 
—Arrive at tourney and 

register to perform 
-First round 



5:30 


am- 


5:32 


am- 


5:37 


am- 


5:50 


am- 


6:00 


am 


6:05 


am- 


8:27 


am 


8:30 


am- 




So begins the Saturday of a North Shore 
forensian. Three rounds, countless judges' 
critiques, and an awards ceremony later, 
the same forensian may emerge with a 
medal for his performance. The North 
Shore forensics team consisted this year of 
Andrew Barr (performing from the plays 
Bent and Talley's Folly), Seemi Ghazi 
(reading prose by James Joyce and 
speaking extemporaneously), and Murph 
Henderson (performing original speeches 
and a scene from Talley's Folly). This team, 
thanks to late evening rehearsals, to Julie 
Miller, and to Scott Smith, proved victorious 
in all but one tourney and even came 
within three places of going to the 
National Forensics Tournament in Kansas 
City. 

Although lack of interest may cause the 
death of forensics at North Shore in 1984, 
members of the 1981-1983 team shall 
continue to regard forensics as the most 
challenging, rewarding, and memorable 
extracurricular activity of their high school 
careers. 




80 





"Imaginary Solo" 

We started the band to fulfill one desire: To Be The Worst 
Band In The World. I think we accomplished that feat 
after our first jam session. Anyway, we have five 
members in our rock, blues and jazz band. The members 
are: Alan Blumberg (Piano), Ron Saslow (Drums), Todd 
Miller (Electric Keyboard and Synthesizer), Dave 
Thornburgh (Lead Guitar), and myself (Tenor Saxophone 
and Piano). We usually practice about 5 hours during the 
week and 3-5 hours on the weekend. We played a 
couple of songs in Vaudeville and have been scheduled 
to play at a dance, a Morning Ex, and at the Senior 
Party. 

The one event that we will all remember about our band 
occurred when we were playing "Good Love" in 
Vaudeville. Todd was playing both his electric keyboard 
and synthesizer, but he had forgotten to turn on his 
synthesizer. He thought he was playing, but he wasn't. 

Being in a band is both an interesting and a fun 
experience. Despite the arguments between Alan and 
Ron, we are having a great time! 

— Mike Bransfield 






THE BAND 



81 




YEARBOOK 



SHINE 

THAT 

MIRROR! 



From the depths of the Laurie Osberg Memorial Office (a 
room smaller than the girls' washroom) come mysterious 
piles of flat white bags with words scrawled across them. 
The bags contain the elements for single pages of The 
Mirror. Curious upper schoolers crane to see the contents 
of each bag: "Wait— is that Wendy's page? ... Oh, can I 
see soccer?" Alas! The dedicated Mirror staff members 
must turn away their fans and make hay before the sun 
goes down — or at least before two a.m. the day of the 
book deadline. 

— Murph Henderson 






82 



<*<S 






Andrew Ban: Mild-mannered editor, 
known for calming hysterical staff 
members who are informed they must 
fit another picture on to their layouts 
and for his "way" with ditto sheets. 
Murph Henderson: Made ever- 
popular by her "let's try it again's," 
her bizarre casettes, and her 
abhorrence of ditto sheets. 
Steve Goldon: King of the dark room 
and a model of the latest in labcoats. 
Steve prefers never to deal with ditto 
sheets. 

Seemi Ghazi: Known for her "have 
you seen's?" and the oranges she 
leaves in the office daily. "Squeems" 
has been known to say, "Ditto 
sheets? What are those?" 
Jon Schwarz: Famous for conning 
local businesses and parents into 
buying ads (maybe he sells them on 
the concept by showing them ditto 
sheets) and for his "DO NOT TOUCH 
THESE UNCLAIMED YEARBOOKS BECAUSE 
I AM RESPONSIBLE FOR THEM" signs. 
Carol Janson: Resident mad artist. 
Chris Charnas & Peter Karmin: Forever 
threatening a sports-less yearbook. 
Budge Cooper: "I'll finish it at home." 
Mr. Almquist: Known as . . . our 
saviour. 








84 









85 



*^>*< 





<F 











88 







1st row (l-r): Roden, Allison, Franke, Dole, Conroy, Hall, Melissas, 
Weisse, Lopas, Almquist, Galbraith, Beerheide. 2nd row: Pliska, Keefe, 
Lundquist, Geyer, Turley, French, Jackson, Opdycke. 3rd row: 
Shipley, Bard, Foster, Roger, Gundlach, Betancourt-Mullen, Doar. 4th 
row: Radloff, Hunt, Ghitelman, Abelmann, O'Hara, Casper, McCarty. 
5th row: Clement, Kronon, Chiapetta, Freisem, Wagner. 6th row: Hall, 
Dionne, Thornburgh, Goss, Bach, Trevaskis, Rosewald. 



89 



ADMINISTRATION 





RICHARD P. HALL 




BETSY ULBRICH 




ROBERT E. BEERHEIDE 




SHARON L. DOLE 



LAWRENCE P. CHIAPPETTA 



90 




HERBERT DOTTERER 




GLORIA SEIBERT 





BARBARA MODISETT 




MARY ELIZABETH HUNT 



BARBARA FRANKE 



91 



gg 





THOMAS DOAR 



NANCY EMRICH 





VIOLET DORMODY 



THERESA STEIGERWALD 



MARIE 
LUNDQUIST 




92 




ADMINISTRATION 



DORIS BINDER 





RICHARD P. HALL (° h wow! De i° vu! > 




JANE FENNINGER 



RAMONA KRONON 



93 



UPPER SCHOOL ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 



MICHAEL CONROY 





GERISSA 
FRENCH 



94 





There are more things in heaven and earth, 

Horatio, 
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. . . 



There is nothing either good or 
bad but thinking makes it so . . 




The mind is its own place, and in itself 

can make a hell of heaven, a heaven of hell. 



—William Shakespeare 



EUNICE JACKSON 
CHAIRPERSON 



95 



MATH DEPT. 



I have found NSCDS to be a very intimate 
community of faculty, staff and student body. 
Classes are small enough for personalized 
attention, and students seem to take their 
responsibilities quite seriously. I enjoy the 
rapport between faculty and students and 
have been impressed by the school's attempt 
to provide activities to further the closeness of 
teachers and students. I've been amazed at 
the variety of activities available for so small a 
school; all the sports teams, Interim Week, and 
Morning Ex name only a few. My classes are 
fun, and I am enjoying the challenge of 
teaching. I have been favorably impressed with 
the whole NSCDS community. 

BETH FOSTER 




ELISSE 
GHITELMAN 



The words that best convey my 
impression of North Shore is that it's 
a friendly community. It's a real 
treat to teach here. 




96 






VICTORIA AND DR. LAWRENCE CHIAPPETTA 

"From the hills of Woodstock to the Fields of Waving 
Purple"— even The Who can't make that statement!— Dr. C. 




JACK BARD 



97 



THE UPPER SCHOOL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 




LAWRENCE CHIAPETTA 



The 60's— The flower people planted the seeds. 

The 70's— The me generation germinated the seeds. 

The 80's— Will bloom with excitement. 

You are the 80's, you'll make it work! 

Good-Luck Class of '83— 

Mr. Goss 



WILLIAM GOSS— CHAIRMAN 



martin Mccarty 






THE UPPER SCHOOL 
SOCIAL STUDIES 
DEPARTMENT 



"Spontaneous" words of wisdom? I only wish 
you all well and say sincerely that you are 
an enjoyable group with whom to work and 
be. I have felt the spontaneous warmth and 
consideration you have for one another and 
for those of us working with you. Last summer 
Miss Donohue commented on the fact that a 
negative aspect of her fellowship year was 
not working with you in your senior and final 
year, and I know she would join me in these 
thoughts. "May the road rise to meet you . . . 
May the sun shine warm upon your face ..." 

— William Freisem. 



WILLIAM FREISEM 




i 
JOHN D. INGRAM 



NANCY GEYER 



99 




FOREIGN 
LANGUAGE 



ADRIENNE 
WEISSE 




DACIER (As if in a daze) II avait les 

capsules sur lui . . . (Catherine tries to 

look at Lemaitre. He holds her back 

from the body) Non, ne le regarde 

pas; c'est horrible. 

CATHERINE Quoi? Qu'est-ce qu'il y a? 

(A glimmer of the real truth dawns on 

him) 

DACIER Je sais comment il est mort. 

Le virus, Catherine, le virus! II tue . . . il 

est mortel. C'est ca qui a tue' 

Lemaitre! 

— Suivez La Piste 



JOYCE 

LOPAS 

(CHAIRPERSON) 




100 





ALISHA 

BETANCOURT- 

MULLEN 



DIANE DORN 





Salve te, pu eri et puel lae 

Sal ve, magis ter (magis tra)! 

Consi dite, si pla cet. Le o! 

Adsum, magister. 

Sur gite, disci puli (disci pulae) 

Dlscipuli surgunt. 

Canta te: "Al ma Ma ter!" 

Discipuli cantant. 

Bene! Nune vale te, discipuli. 

Va le, magister. 



Good morning, boys and girls! 

Good morning, teacher! 

Sit down, please. Leo! 

I am present, teacher. 

Stand up, pupils! 

The pupils stand. 

Sing: "Alma Mater!" 

The pupils sing. 

Good! Now good-by, pupils. 

Good-by, teacher. 



101 



ARTS DEPT. 



JOHN 

ALMQUIST 

(CHAIRMAN) 

ATTENTION ALL ALMQUIST FOLLOWERS! 
Mr. Almquist is going to move to Holly- 
wood to dance professionally. 

— seen on art room door 






«* 



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CAROL 

RADLOFF 

(CHAIRPERSON) 




JACKIE 
MELISSAS 



The man that hath no music 

in himself, 
Nor is not mov'd with concord 

of sweet sounds, 
Is fit for treasons, stratagems 

and spoils; 
The motions of his spirit are 

dull as night, 
And his affections 

dark as Erebus: 
Let no such man be trusted. 

— Mark the music. 

— Shakespeare 



102 



VIN ALLISON 
(CHAIRMAN) 





SCOTT SMITH 




LINDA GIBSON 




SHELDON ROSENBAUM 



ROGER SHIPLEY 

Don't let 'em sit on you, even when 
you're down.— "P." Shipley 



Your children are not your children. 
They are the sons and daughters of Life's 

longing for itself . . . 
You may give them your love but not 

your thoughts, 
For they have their own thoughts. 
You may house their bodies but not 

their souls, 
For their souls dwell in the house of 

tomorrow, which you cannot visit, 

not even in your dreams . . . 
For life goes not backward nor tarries 

with yesterday. 

— Kahlil Gibran 




103 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



"Com'on, girls! You're late! YES, OF COURSE 
there's gym today!" 

Every female North Shore upper schooler heard 
these words bellow from her smiling coach's 
throat as second or seventh period began 
each day in 1982. The period did not feel 
complete until that reminder echoed into the 
gym from Mickey's office. 

In 1983, the gym atmosphere changed. Those 
cries no longer rang through the locker room; 
"Mickey" — the mainstay of upper school phys. 
ed — took an unexpected retirement in January 
of 1983 and was replaced by Kathleen Keefe, 
queen of the aerobics mat. In her wildest 
dreams, Jane Fonda never imagined the 
amount of "flesh burned" as North Shore 
females battled to keep up with Kathleen's 
rigorous program. Aerobics, modern dance, 
running, C.P.R., self defense and Softball made 
up but a fraction of Kathleen's curriculum. 




DEBBIE McFALL 



The smile and encouraging words that Mickey 
provided combined well with Kathleen's varied 
and vigorous program to make 1982-1983 a 
memorable year of girls' phys ed at North 
Shore. 





KATHLEEN KEEFE 



104 



JAY BACH 



r 






AMY DEUBLE 






martin Mccarty 



105 



MIDDLE SCHOOL 
FACULTY 



SUE CLEMENT 




WILLIAM 
CASPER 




JULIE HALL 
HEAD OF MIDDLE SCHOOL 





DORIS GALBRAITH 



DAVID THORNBURGH 



PAUL DIONNE 



WmBBffi 




IH 


"*•■'■' _^* 












SUSAN GUNDLACH 



ALICE LAWSON 



107 



CAROL adcliviminin 




MARY WAGNER TOM DOAR 




JENNIFER PLISKA 




MAINTENANCE 

AND 

CAFETERIA 

STAFF 



Maintenance: Arcelious Donald, 
Patrick McDermott, Joseph Dragula, 
George Mitchell (the everpresent man 
with the calico cat), Paul Korpai, Ann 
Swanson. 



Evelyn Williams, Ann 
Swanson, Evelyn 
Kruckenberg, 
Ophelia Powell, Rose 
Reyna, Heng Kuong. 





Honk if you love "Evie"! (By the way, 
have you hugged your lunch card 
today?) 



no 





Mrs. Dormody will leave us this year after 24 years of service to 
North Shore. The only problem with writing a tribute to her is to 
know where to begin! She has often talked about retiring, but 
the time has always seemed wrong as she considered, first and 
foremost, the good of the school. As Headmaster, I hold the 
view that any time is wrong for Mrs. Dormody to leave her 
Dunlap Hall office. This June, we will reluctantly accept her 
departure, with sadness for us who will not see her each day, 
but with happiness for her as she enjoys her well-deserved 
change of routine. I suspect we will receive postcards from 
many exotic places, and she will set the standard for life in 
retirement as she has set the example for excellent work 
throughout her time here at North Shore. I am fully confident that 
we will see her back often, though, and her many friends 
among students and faculty alike will be delighted to hear of 
her newest exploits. 

—Richard P. Hall 




WE'LL MISS YOU, MRS. 
DORMODY! 



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KINDERGARTEN 






1st row(l-r): J. Goodman, R. Dhanda, H. Bishop, T. Peebles, A. Shipley, J. 
Keefe-Burg, S. Scott, E. Cooper, H. Lewis. 2nd row: L. Brown, L. Markey, L. 
Mitchell, D. Wirtz, T. Shybut, A. Langerman. 3rd row: Sally Neving, K. Keady, 
U. Baldoceda, D. Lidow, K. Pettry, F. Brown, K. Webster. 4th row: M. 
Madigan, R. Campbell, V. Beemer, N. Furtak. 5th row: M. Marzano, M. 
Sloby, M. Lewis, A. Richardson. 6th row: G. Kalpake, H. Shotwell 







THE LAST DAY OF SEPTEMBER 
by Kindergarten 

The sky looks like heaven, 

It's white, light blue, middle blue, whole blue. 

The sky would feel soft, warm, cold. 
The sky would taste loke God, nice and fresh. 
It would taste like all the candies in the world. 
A bite would be fluffy and soft. 

The sky would smell like air, trees, bark, flowers. 
It would sound like wind flapping things and birds. 

The grass looks like a flat line, 

It looks thin and short — it's pointing to the sky. 

When the wind blows it falls down. 

It goes flat when you step on it. 

The grass gets all wet when it rains. 

The grass goes to it's home when it's cold, 

It gets little and goes down, down, down into the dirt. 

It does not want to get cold. 

The grass feels cushiony, 

Nice, like fur. 

It tastes like broccoli, spinach, and smells funny, 

like parsley, trees, dirt. 

It tickles your face and makes you sneeze. 

When you kiss the grass, it scratches; 

It's kissing you back. 

The grass sounds like cornflakes crunching, breaking, 

It's a wavy sound. 

If you're quiet, you can hear a worm . . . 





119 




k R \S 




F 
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R 
S 
T 

G 
R 
A 
D 
E 




L. to r. from bottom: Gerd Stodick, George Smith, Kate Ferguson, 
Dave Lane, Josh Opdyke, Margo Tatgenhorst, Peter de Young, 
Carin Healy, Jon Balen-Tilkin, Laura Fifield, Chad Charowhas, 
Sarah Silver, Jenny Ediden, Noah Richmond, J. P. Marzano, David 
Johnason, Justin Pohn, Max Kuecker, Carol Abelmann, Amy 
Chiappetta 



120 











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— Kathleen Keefe 



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121 



SECOND GRADE 




A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF SECOND GRADE 
by Jenny Pliska 

In social studies, second graders learned how people lived in ear- 
ly America. They set up an old-fashioned school and made 
feather pens and walnut ink. Students later studied historical and 
modern-day Chicago, a subject which culminated in visits to 
museums and skycrapers. 

In language arts, second graders increased their reading ability. 
They wrote stories and journals. The Pliska Pickle Publishing 
Company, founded by second grade teacher Jenny Pliska, pub 
lished dozens of books written by the children. In math, second 
graders investigated geometry, basic computation, fractions, big 
numbers, and how to tell time. 





8» w 





122 



1st row (l-r): J. Nichols, E. Smith, M. Prior, C. Keady. 2nd row: E. 
Missner, E. Jacobs. 3rd row: A. Wheat, S. Guinn. 4th row: C. 
Weingart-Ryan, J. Feldman, C. Beemer, K. Cooper, K. Johnson, E. 
Williams, J. Pliska, T. Heinz, B. de la Fuente. 5th row: A. Flint, M. 
McGrath, J. Speer, G. Jar.ab& J>- Jtotivsi ■^. ■ . w j -u fat. u^ 



THIRD GRADE 



is . . . the rabbit ... Egg Landers 
. . . lots of homework . . . 
mystery feet . . . E.B. White . . . 
computer club . . . baseball 
games . . . mathmagicians . . . 
being published ... Mr. T's diets 
. . . loud . . . 4-square 
competition . . . field trips . . . 
ghost stories . . . Mexican food . . 
. evening skywatches . . . Rubica 
. . . fun . . . Sting game ... the 
clay ball . . . tangrams . . . time 
machine . . . King program . . . 
having two tall and skinny 
teachers ... Mr. Smith's New 
York cheesecake . . . oodle- 
noodle ... the greatest. 



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Sitting on the steps (l-r) 1st step: Josh Harding. 2nd step: Brenda Paul, Libby 
Dietrich. 3rd step: Tory Richardson, Ruffy Raffaldini, 4th step: Michael Susk, 
Blanca Baldoceda. 5th step: Jona Ori, Amy Fink, Carter Frank. 6th step: Jorie 
Stephen, Julie Westhead, Mr. Trevaskis, John O'Hara. Sitting on ledge (l-r): 
Oliver Zettwer, Bryan Resendez, Megan Lane, Joanna Tepper. Standing on 
ledge in front (l-r): Chris Fifield, David Tawmoush, T.C. Whiting. Standing in 
back (l-r): Henry Pltzele, Carsten Thode, Scott Smith. Standing in front: Warner 
Saunders. 




124 




Im± 



Us 




If Third Graders Were in Charge of the World 

If Third Graders were In charge of the world 
Everything would be free 
People could fly 
Peace would be everywhere 
And blind people could see 

If Third Graders were in charge of the world 
School would start at nine 
You could have a friend sleep over 
any night of the week 
The zoo would be one block away 
And there would be no commercials on tv 

If Third Graders were in charge of the world 
There would be four wheel drive bicycles 
We wouldn't have criminals on earth 
Everyone would live in an amusement park 
And parents would usually say yes 

If Third Graders were in charge of the world 
You would pay no taxes 
Children would be able to drive cars 
(And parents would have to sit in the back) 
The White Sox would win the pennant 
And vegetables would talk when they're ripe 

If Third Graders were in charge of the world 
Everyone would have a heart 
So they'd have one friend for a start 
Yet, for all these changes we suggest 
Best of all, we like the world just the way 
it is. 

—Third Graders at NSCDS, 9/10/82 



rencici y 



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125 



FOURTH GRADE 

... a daily journal, a twice monthly special person, a 15 
minute clean up detail that means special care for 
Sugar, the rabbit for whom we're pet sitting ... the 3500 
B.C. in Social Studies, the 1900's in L.A. and 1983 in 
current events . . . field trips, lunches in Chicago, 
cooking our own lunch, trees for the birds, primitive tools, 
play-writing and producing, 4-sguare . . . book reports 
on faraway places, Social Studies projects on famous 
people, drills on Spilling Demons . . . 

All make up the 4th grade year at N.S.C.D.S. 






First Row: Heather Bach, John Stoops, 
Daniel Beider, Aislinn Weingart-Ryan, 
Mrs. McClung, Jamie DeYoung, 
Gregory Getner, Peter Huang. Second 
Row: Sebastian Voegler, John 
McGrath, Ellen Rapport, Kendra Pohn, 
Tripp Frank, Nicole Johnson, Bob 
Missner. Third Row: Geoff Miller, 
Yasmen Fatah, Nina Stodiek, Kendra 
Nichols. 



Blue 

Rough water 

Waves hitting smashing 

Powerful 

— Denis Healy 



126 






Homework Excuses 

Mrs. Opdycke I didn't get my homework 
in because, well, because, um, let's see. 
I was eating a lollipop when a wind 
came along. It blew my lollipop against 
my paper, and out the window the two 
went. Imagine, it stuck to my sister's 
hair!! She was playing in the sandbox. 
Well, we couldn't pull it out so we had 
to cut my sister's hair. You should see 
my mother cut hair!! She's awful! She 
was cutting the lollipop out of my sister's 
hair and she cut up my paper when she 
cut out the lollipop. The lollipop was 
stuck to my sister's hair and now its all 
cut up! 

— Aislinn 






127 




FIFTH GRADE 






128 






""""' imrtjii 



This fall I asked some lower schoolers to tell me 
what age they would like to be if they could 
magically be any age. After quick reflection, 
they replied that they would like to be sixteen 
or seventeen. When I asked them why, they 
replied that they wanted to be the same age 
as their high school friends. They reasoned that, 
if they were sixteen or seventeen, they would 
be even closer to Chris, Alan, Eric, Seemi, 
Murph and others. 

I was really touched by their answer. It 
reinforced to me the value of a family school. 
Our Lower Schoolers are genuinely involved in 
the entire school. It is their Opera, their Santa 
Claus Party, and their yearbook. I hope the 
Upper School students realize what an 
important part they play in making the Lower- 
School a special place. Their impact is far- 
reaching, and it is definitely appreciated. 

— Tom Doar 





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3rd: John Repenning, Matt Lickerman, Stacy Ratner, Tommy Griffin, Joanne Avery, 
Win Repenning. 2nd: James Cucco, John Hatfield, Dan Devine, George Douvas, 
Peggy Smith, Cristina Cooper, Shannon Grogun, Mr. Robert Kramer, Eve Feldman. 
1st: Jason Ori, Juliet Moffat, Lucy Kerr, Thierry Peugeot, Marisol Mello, Beth 
Cavanaugh 



129 









130 






■ ■■■■■■^ 



hi 9H9 Bl HH 



SIXTH GRADE 





1st row (l-r): M. 
Grogan, P. 
Geyer, E. Hall, K. 
Moore, D. Nealy. 
2nd row: T. Smith, 
M. Voegler, C. 
Manly, C. Davis, 
K. Fink, N. 
Demetriou, A. 
Spertus, C. 
Robinson. 3rd 
row: J. Hayes, F. 
Ai, T. Cekan, M. 
Ferris, C. 
Toyooka, E. 
O'Hara, S. 
Tepper, R. 
Shoeder, H. 
Statland, A. 
Grumet 



Sixth grade can be a bewildering but exciting experience for students at NSCDS. 
"Stepping up" to the Middle School involves attending a new building, acquainting 
oneself with new faces, meeting a challenging curriculum, and assuming varying 
responsibilities that accompany this giant step. 

In the fall a sixth-grader is faced with immediate choices. Should a boy play football 
or soccer? A girl must decide between the volleyball team and the field hockey 
squad. Even lunch can provide difficult choices because the soft drink option is finally 
a reality and a student is no longer limited to only the table where his teacher is seat- 
ed. In addition, each student must choose to be on the Tent Committee or the Food 
Committee or the Campfire Committee in preparation for the three day camping trip 
to Turkey Run State Park in Indiana. He becomes involved in his insect collection, is al- 
ways easily identified by his net and jar, and must decide on classification once the 
elusive prey has been captured. 

As soon as the new routine of sixth grade has been mastered, the season and the 
program change. Now the sixth-grader chooses between extra-curricular sport, bask- 
etball, and a daily physical education class. He must, furthermore, decide on one or 
two mini-courses from a rich assortment offered on varying days, resulting in a sched- 
ule that changes from day to day. The long winter days are brightened when, on 
Valentine's Day, hearts are dissected as part of the life science program. 



With the coming of spring, events occur as rapidly as the days fly by. Preparations 
are afoot for the Middle School Musical. The sixth-graders busy themselves with pub- 
licity and advance ticket sales while rehearsals progress, then sell tickets and refresh- 
ments and distribute programs (the cover design by a sixth-grader) on the exciting 
night of the show. The boys and girls who choose softball or baseball as an extra- 
curricular activity are in good condition for the Sixth Grade Sports Day, when our 
school hosts sixth-graders from several schools in the Chicago area for a full day of 
sports activities, a picnic lunch, and the demonstration of team cheers. 



June comes quickly, and a full and varied school year is over. 



—Doris Galbraith 



134 








135 



SEVENTH GRADE 






1st row: Willie Deitrick, Debbie Goldberg, Mike Lickerman, Brian Dole, 
Scott Saslow, Kathy Karanganis. 2nd: Mary Ann Huang, Kareem 
Nagib, Jennifer Finnell, Jeff Pierchala, Ruthie Stebbins, Rachel 
Drucker, Wendy Gargiulo, Karen Paul. 3rd: Chris Cooper, Alex White, 
Kristen Lawson, J. P. Hamm, Larry Welsh, Elliot Reis, Jon Reinsdorf, Mark 
McGrath. 4th: Candace Rondeau, Max Fischer, Courtney Williams, 
Lisa Kornylak, Annie Aggens, Libby Peruchinl, Lori Horton 



136 






Seventh graders are enthusiastic, willing to try new 
things, and eager to learn. Their school year is full of 
a variety of experiences which capitalize on those 
qualities. In English we read novels by American 
authors and do many kinds of writing. The students 
put together publications and create dramatic 
presentations, using materials studied in American 
history. Other required academic subjects — math, 
science, and foreign language — are scheduled ac- 
cording to interests and ability, so the students' pro- 
grams in these classes are also very varied. 

We also plan outside activities as part of our 
curriculum. For example, we visit Springfield and at- 
tend plays, such as the Performing Arts Repertory 
Theatre's presentation of Freedom Train. Some of our 
activities we do just for the fun of it. Our week-long 
trip to an ecology camp at Innisfree, Michigan, in 
January was perhaps the high point of the year. The 
reason the seventh grade is special is only in part 
due to the interesting and fun things we do togeth- 
er. More important is the spirit and good humor of 
the kids themselves! 

— Sue Gundlach and Mary Roden 





137 



EIGHTH GRADE 



The 1982-83 school year has been an exciting and interesting 
one for the eighth grade. A visit to the Peace Museum, a talk 
with a native of India, several French movies, a trip to 
Michel's French Pastry Shop, and a trip to see the epic film 
Ghandi all added to the variety of exciting experiences the 
eighth graders enjoyed. Some eighth graders were also 
fortunate enough to have the opportunity to enjoy Eunice 
Jackson's lively interpretation of Shakespeare. The greatest 
and most rewarding experience for this year's class, however, 
was the production of the classic musical comedy, Once 
Upon a Mattress. 

As leaders of the middle school, the eighth grade set the 
tone for a very challenging, 
rewarding, and intellectually 
stimulating year. Many will carry fond 
memories of this year as they 
continue down the road of 
knowledge. 
— Lisa McClung and Dave Thornburgh 






r 





138 











1st row: Fred Scott, David Pascal, Joel de la Fuente, Justin Barr, Cappy 
Peruchini, Evan Schoter, David Hoffheimer. 2nd: Matt Newman, Joel 
Jacobson, Lisa Cekan, Lisa McClung, Molly Shotwell, Cindy Brennan, 
Jennifer Schecter, Jenni Barr, Chris Avery, J.B. Opdycke, Mr. David 
Thornburgh. 3rd: Mr. Paul Dionne, Andrea Nash, Elizabeth Stroll, Lauri 
Reagan, Heather Utzinger, Victoria Toyooka, Kris Demetriou, Amy Hall, Ari 
Kogut, Brendan Hasenstab, Tom Stone, Dan Bloedom, Mrs. Alice Lawson. 
4th: Andy Brown, Bill Bach, Lawrence Williams, Ned Wolpert, John Devine, 
Taka Nikaidoh, Chris Fisher, Aryeh Richmond, Eldon Kerr, Alex Gramm, Ross 
Sutcliffe 



139 










140 



The Middle School year: (By Julie Hall) 

September: "At Turkey Run, remember the Devil's Icebox, climbing the 
ladders, and calling owls at night?" 

October: "This year on Workday, maybe I'll get more leaves In the bag 

than in my hair." 

"Where was Hunkleberry Brown on Halloween?" 

November: "My fingers are frozen, and it's too dark to see. Why can't I play 
volleyball instead?" 

December: "The stage was swarming with Middle Schoolers, but, you know, 
we sounded pretty good when we sang." 

January: "This year my resolution is to start my science project way ahead 

of time." 

"I know, I know. Brush off the snow before I come in the building." 

February: "It was fun crawling in the ice caves at Innisfree, and sliding on 
the dunes, but the sledding hill was best." 

March: "But I did my homework. I just left it on my desk at home." 
"But I couldn't do my homework last night. It was my sister's birthday." 
"Does anyone have some white-out? I've got two pages to go and it's due 
next period." 

April: "The Middle Show must go on! Do you think the paramedics will be 
there?" 

May: "See, we have this special day for throwing frisbies, playing bingo, 
betting on horses, and eating — and eating — and eating." 

June: "At graduation, it's hard to recognize the eighth graders when they're 
so dressed up. They look so much more grown up than they did when they 
were in sixth grade." 







141 





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FRESHMEN 



144 




When asked for 
quotations to describe 
their class, freshmen said: 
"I could think of some 
choice ones, but they 
wouldn't be printable." 

(-Chris Jeskey) 
"All I can think of is Bruce 
running around singing 
'Shoot That Golden Arrow' 



(-Katie Stitt) 
"We're queer." 

(-Bruce Peters) 
"He means he's queer!" 

(-Jessica Kotler) "I 
know! Let's go buy a box 
of gum!" 

(-Christy Lincoln) 
"Gum is the answer to 
mankind's future." 

(-Anonymous 
bystander) 

And the future of the class 
of '86 . . . remains to be 
seen. 




1st row (l-r): K. Stitt, E. Toyooka, S. McKeon, B. Peters, D. Clement, A. Patel, N. 
Repenning, E. Mathies. 2nd row: S. Geist, B. Lax, E. Farrell, A. Wirtz, J. Marrinson, P. 
DeWoskin, M. Bransfield, J. Swanson, L. Davis. 3rd row: E. Hines, S. Griffin, M. Young, D. 
Burnell, L. Gorman, J. Kotler, N. Oguss, F. Cristol, C. Mertz, C. Jesky. 4th row: K. Carlson, 
C. Aggens, K. Moffat, L. Fleishman, T. Patel, C. Lincoln, J. Heyman, S. Britt. 5th row: J. 
De Patie, M. E. Wing, R. Andreou. Absent: E. Fujita, B. Nigro, K. Reilly 




I 45 I 



Sophomores will remember 1982- 
83 for the many sayings that 
became familiar in class or 
among friends. In English, 
Sophomores were often greeted 
with a, "Hey, Folksie!" or an, 
' ' Okey-Dokey-Artichokey. ' ' 

Sophomores also had names for 
each other. There was the ever- 
popular "Communist," not to 
mention "Bogus". There were 
phrases that referred to our 
favorite daytime and nighttime 
dramas. The daily, "What 
happened on 'All My Kids?' " 
and the weekly, "Did you see 
'Dynasty?' " often sounded 
throughout the basement locker- 
room. 

— Bobby de la Fuente 







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First Row: Sonja Janson, Karen Irving, Mi- 
chelle Griffin, Holly Pollard, Jackie Scott, 
Cathy O'Malley, Amy Peacock, Linda 
Bartell, Tamar Fleishman, Scott Dole, 
Richard Brown. Second Row: Kristen 
Kuhns, Lorna Melhus, Tanya Grivas, Jamie 
Hauselman, Sandy Diller, Holly Schauer, Bil- 
ly Griffin, Paul Westhead, Aron Newman, 
Jody Katz, Third Row: Meredith Kaplan. 
Fourth Row: Matt Wilder, Kyle Moore, Ste- 
ven Paige, Bobby Delafuente, Eric Cha, 
Chris O'Hara, Rob Hannah, Jamee 
GJames Gassel, Rashid Ghazi, Eric 
Almquist 




147 




1st row (l-r): Ron Saslow, Katie Geyer, Louisa Bornstein, Beth Conrad, Nadia Nagib, 
Sonya Newenhouse, Josie Saltoun, Cheryl Rickel, Liz Wainwright, Laurie Wirtz, Carol 
Eresian. 2nd row: Peter Grivas, Tom Schneider, Aria Medvin, Laura Schreiber, Maria 
Machimbarrena, Bernie Ai, Mitch Tyson, Jennifer Hunter, Chris Wussler, Lisa Kandelman, 
Peggy Weisenberg, Matt Leobowitz. 3rd row: Billy Marrinson, Sean Murphy, John Theiss, 
Rob Quayle, Debbie Pinsof, Maxine Lechter, Caroline Williams, Holly Chandler, Amy 
Silver, Ken Park, Eric Kaplan. 4th row: Frank Ballesteros, David Marshall, Hyong Chung, 
Henry Harbury, Steve Goldin, Brock Fowler, David Brown. 






This year's Junior class 
was — how does one phrase 
this tactfully? — different. 
Although confined to a 
basement cell, they found 
ways to keep their sanity 
despite the awesome, often 
intense, workload and the 
few, greatly needed, free 
periods. In the past, Jr. 
classes have been notorious 
for never having enough 
money when prom-time 
rolled around. The Class of 
'84, not wanting to break 
tradition, is no exception. 
Candy-selling, one of their 
many attempts at fund 
raising, turned out to be a 
challenge to see which 
student would charge the 
most candy in one week. 
Their next project may be 
selling Spam, their favorite 
food next to candy, door to 
door, maybe with free 
recipe booklets. 

Other meaning memories 
were: the numerous soap 
opera updates, ball room 
dancing through the 
hallways and panic stricken 
girls racing to White Hen 
because of Tab withdrawal. 
The most important things 
they learned this year are 
that students can't buy 
lunch without a N.S.C.D.S. 
charge card and never, 
ever open the windows. 

—Peggy Weisenberg 



From the perspective of an outsider looking in, the senior 
homeroom, littered with books, coats, papers, and bodies, 
has no special meaning. Yet, this "home away from home" 
from 8:30 am till ail hours of the night is the all-important axis 
around which the senior class revolves. Aside from providing 
seniors with news about parties and college acceptances, 
this room and its inhabitants has been responsible for 
countless proposals, editorials, and organizations, all designed 
to improve the school for the students and faculty. 

The senior class of 1983 may best be remembered for: 

— the senseless killing of a sponge-rubber Pac Man and 
subsequent search and trial of the murderer (We 
forgive you, Emily.) 

— frequent trips to Homer's for Oreo cookie shakes to 
guzzle along with popcorn (How much do we owe 
you, Jeremy?) 

— coming to school dressed in summer clothes during 
January for an updated class photo (Great legs, 
Seemi!) 

— some of the most unusual names ever to be 
screamed down the hallways of North Shore (Bubba, 
Budge, NupNup, Beak, Rosey, Lund-yo, Pwee, and 
Spaz, to name a few.) 

— truly living the spirit of the season with the addition of 
a ten-foot Christmas tree to the homeroom, along 
with a "Secret Santa" gift-swapping party (Just why 
did half the presents slosh when they were moved?) 

— holding the North Shore record for the highest PSAT 
scores for half a year, only to be untimely robbed of 
this honor by the juniors (Thanks for trying, Pelle.) 

— lodging various beasts behind the closed homeroom 
door, ranging from a full-grown dog to a very 
nervous kitten (Looking back, maybe the cat should 
have stayed outside; the smell will leave your bag 
someday, Jon!) 

— instigating an all-school football poll with definitely 
high stakes for the winners and the losers (Isn't 
gambling against school rules Peter?) 

This close-knit group of students travelled from Spring Green, 
Wisconsin to Galena, Illinois to the Winter Club skating rink in 
Lake Forest . . . together. Yet, we always returned to North 
Shore. For giving us the impetus to venture forth but always 
welcoming us back, we thank you, NSCDS. 




SENIORS 




-"■• 










inn 





1st row (l-r): Shawn McKeon, Leslie Gordon, 
Reed Snyder. 2nd row: Carol Janson, Sarah 
Britt, Jane Dettmers, Eve Brooks, Lila Hutchins, 
Lisa Purze, Wendy Aggens, Chris Charnas, 
Andy Wolpert, Jim Block. 3rd row: Naomi 
Golden, Murph Henderson, Kate Fernstrom, 
Mary Abelmann, Seemi Ghazi, Budge Coo- 
per, Lois Hustwayte, John Schwartz, Ian Flint, 
John Krohn, Peter Karmin. 4th row: John 
Parks, Eric Chassin, 
Todd Miller, Jamie 
Knupp, Eric Lunding, 
Michael Bransfield, Chris 
Seline, Gonzalo 

Sentmenat, Pelle 

Harbury, Dave Howland, 
Chris Boros, Jason 
Smith, Dave DeWoskin. 
Absent: Donna Amos, 
Andrew Barr, Vicki Car- 
son, Jeremy 
Goldberger, Caroline, 
Kullberg, Marc Peters, 
Emily Wanberg, Alison 
Wirtz. 



ALUMNI UPDATE— CLASS OF 1983 



Neurosurgeon, MARC PETERS, reportedly threw down his 
scalpel during an operation when things were not going as 
planned. Said one nurse, "He simply spazzed out!" 

Female athlete extraordinaire, ALISON ROSEN, denies reports 
that she will replace Bruce Jenner as spokesperson for 
Wheaties. Blushing, Ms. Rosen confided, "I could never fill 
Bruce's jock strap." 

Scandal echoed throughout the halls of North Shore last 
week when GONZALO SENTMENAT returned from Barcelona to 
claim Mr. Hall as his real father. Although the headmaster de- 
nies the affront vehemently, the striking resemblance 
between the two cannot be attributed to coincidence. 

Policewoman LOIS HUSTWAYTE single handedly raided an 
illegal male brothel in London. You've got to hand it to Lois; 
she's certainly full of spunk! 

ANDREW BARR, star of stage and screen, denies all reports 
that his good buddy Brooke Shields can beat him in one-on- 
one basketball. Says Barr, "The height difference means 
nothing. I've got more speed, agility, and stamina. Besides, 
I'm prettier." 

Sister EMILY WANBERG told this source last week, "If the right 
guy comes along, I'll leave this convent. I'm not too thrilled 
about this place, but I researched it and was quite im- 
pressed by the basketball team." 

Justice ANDY WOLPERT made Supreme Court history today by 
ruling that the woman who believed furniture salesman TODD 
MILLER came with her new living room sofa had indeed been 
misled at the time of purchase. As compensation, Justice 
Wolpert awarded the woman a life-sized Todd doll. Miller, 
who was quite amused by the whole incident, added that 
the publicity has helped his real career— keyboard player in 
his band, Todd and the Skillet Lickers. 

Professional bowler KATE FERNSTROM has shocked both the 
fashion and bowling worlds. She has secretly been wearing 
Ralph Lauren shirts under the traditional polyester smocks. 

JEREMY GOLDBERGER, chairman of Likker, Idonte, Ivan, Noheir 
and Co. predicts that sales will increase with the addition of 
new delivery trucks that can go from zero to sixty in five 
seconds. 

SHAWN MCKEON and LESLIE GORDON have outraged the 
American Kennel Club with their mail-order dog company. 
The two specialize in pedigree pups. 

Flautist LILA HUTCHINS remains pleased with her choice of 
instrument after all these years. This world reknowned musi- 



cian wrly quips, "The only reason the flute is not perfect is it 
lacks a reed." 

In a recent sermon, the Reverend JOHN KROHN preached 
the Gospel According to Bruce Lee. The congregation, 
moved by the Reverend's words, reenacted the final scene 
of Enter the Dragon. 

LISA PURZE, head of Alumni contributions for the class of 1983 
is quite proud of the contribution record set by her peers. 
Said Purze, "I am not surprised at all. They are truly a special 
group of people; we have grown so close." 

Director CHRIS SELINE's new film is all ready being touted as 
one of the scariest movies ever made. One terrified viewer 
was overheard commenting, "Even the credits are frighten- 
ing!" 

CAROLINE KULLBERG has decided to cash in on the Valley Girl 
craze of the early '80s. Her new talking toys, Valley Pigs, 
coin such phrases as "Like Oink, Okay?" 

DAVID HOWLAND, new president of World's Finest Chocolate 
Co., admitted that his reasons for buying the bankrupt 
company were strictly personal. Said Howland, "When ele- 
phants fight, it is the grass that suffers." 

Model NAOMI GOLDEN was rushed to Evanston Hospital yes- 
terday after falling off the runway during a fall fashion show. 
She is listed in stable condition. 

Paramedic "Big AL" BLUMBERG was honored as Chicago 
Paramedic of the Year. He was noted for his carefree man- 
ner at times of crisis. Alan frequently calmed frantic victims 
with a soothing, "Hey, man, you're still alive!" 

In an effort to end all confusion about their identities once 
and for all, MARY ABELMANN and WENDY AGGENS both 
changed their name to Abimbola Gabadamozi. Said Ms. 
Abelmann, spokesperson for the two, or one, "This should 
make things easier for everyone." 

Floor hockey sensation CHRIS BOROS is quickly becoming 
one of the most popular athletes of today. Fans can often 
be heard shouting, "Score for us, Boros!" 

At a press conference last week, MURPH HENDERSON, 
brazenly voiced her opinion that Shakespeare is not all that 
he is cracked up to be. Even more shocking, Ms. Henderson 
continued on to label Hamlet as a flat, one-dimensional 
character and Ophelia as a silly wench. 

Manufacturer JIM BLOCK recently unveiled his new line of 
ceramic coffee mugs, "Mugs not Drugs." When asked, "Why 



152 



mugs?", Jim replied, "You can dip your doughnuts in 'em." 

Medical rarity DONNA AMOS continues to stun members of 
the medical community. It appears that even after years of 
continual ingestion of Homer's Oreo Cookie Shakes, Ms. 
Amos is losing weight. Although her doctors are quite 
worried, Donna remains nonplussed. 

JASON SMITH, star of the hit T.V. show My Three Bereas, has 
been seen wining and dining some of Hollywoods most 
talked about leading ladies. It is said that our young Mr. 
Smith has some twelve weddings pending, as well as numer- 
ous other coed living arrangements. When asked what he 
will do when his carefree life catches up with him, Jason 
blithely responded, "I'll simply ask myself what Greg Brady 
would have done in the situation and act accordingly. 

Fashion hounds VICKI CARSON and ALYSON WIRTZ were ar- 
rested for trespassing. The two, found rummaging through an 
auto junk yard, claimed they were looking for scrap metal to 
use as earrings. 

President of Strat-O-Matic, Inc., CHRIS CHARNAS, announced 
yesterday that his company will no longer make strat. cards 
available for sale to minors. Charnas adamantly believes that 
continued use of the game can impair the mental ability of 
adolescents. 

State Senator BUDGE COOPER continues her fight to eliminate 
the drinking age in Illinois. Ms. Cooper states, "When a child 
is physically able to carry liquor, he should be able to drink 
it." 

San Diego Pardres' catcher, REED SNYDER, will publish his 
memoires in a book entitled, Catch Her In the Raw. Needless 
to say, it promises to be very interesting reading. 

Rising tennis sensation JANE DETTMERS took the tennis world 
by storm when she upset the two top seeds at Wimbolden. 
Unlike many of her competitors, she was unaffected by the 
chilly weather. Quips Jane, "I'm used to being number one." 

JON SCHWARZ recently won the Illinois State Teddy Bear 
Competition. Although a poor showing in the bathing suit 
competition initially set Jon back in the rankings, Jon wowed 
the judges and received excellent markings in the Cute 'n 
Cuddly division. 

EVE BROOKS of Highland Park gave birth to a seven pound 
two ounce handbag. Doctors were mystified. Mother and 
luggage are doing fine. 

Laundry detergent magnate, JOHN PARK has developed a 
new formula which promises to aid housewives in the never 
ending fight against grease and grime. Mr. Park has invented 
a detergent which leads sheets to a long-lasting whiteness. 
Says Park, "This amazing break-through will make your whites 
whiter than ever. 

Singer SEEMI GHAZI, now touring in the revived production of 
Hair, was asked to comment on her participation in the many 
nude scenes. After a short pause, she replied, "It's all done 
with mirrors." 

Hollywood newcomer, ERIC CHASSIN returned to Chicago this I 
past weekend to begin filming his autobiographical film, The I 
Boo's Brother. 



MICHAEL BRANSFIELD, ERIC LUNDING, and JAMIE KNUPP recently 
held a reunion for the Loyal Brotherhood of the Yos (LBYs); 
still no reply from David Lazaro. 

DAVID DEWOSKIN donated his muscles on Tuesday to the Alli- 
ance for Underdeveloped Nations. 

Joint authoresses CAROL JANSON and SARAH BRITT are both 
pleasantly surprised by the rave reviews of their aerobics 
workout book, Putt, Pant, and Pepsi-Free. Could we hope for 
a sequel? 

Scientist IAN FLINT changed his middle name from Chase to 
Like. When asked why, he replied, "Ian Like Flint. I think it's 
funny." 

PETER KARMIN, one of the founders and coaches of the new 
Women's Pro Basketball League (WPBL), is pleased as punch 
at the performance of his team. "We're & 12," beams Pe- 
ter, "but everyone knows that winning is not everything. I'm 
just happy to see women getting a chance to prove that 
they are just as capable as men when it comes to sports." 

U.N. representative PEHR HARBURY suspended all peace talks 
indefinitely after repeated outbursts during the solemn meet- 
ings. Said a spokesperson for the U.S. government, "We were 
quite amazed. One would assume that at this age a man 
could learn to raise his hand." 




153 



MARY MELIN ABELMANN 




There is a woman at the beginning of all 
great things. 

Alphopse De Lamartine 



The best things in life are not free, 
but priceless. 

Benjamin Lichtenburg 



He that can have patience 
can have what he will. 

Benjamin Franklin 




154 





The woods are lovely, 

dark and deep, 
But I have promises to keep, 
And miles to go before I sleep, 
And miles to go before I sleep. 
Robert Frost 



WENDY HALE AGGENS 





DONNA PERDUE AMOS 



Hi-Hi, Bye-Bye! 



Ihop — to serve you! 



What-ya-macall-it! 



Happiness is 
a warm puppy. 

Charles Schultz 



They sent me away 
to teach me how 
to be sensible, 
logical, 
responsible, 
practical. 

Supertramp 
"Breakfast in America' 



Take the midnight stallion . . . 
Ride him hard, follow the 
midnight sun. 

Outlaws— "Ghost Riders" 




156 






Time it was and what a time it was 

It was . . . 

A time of innocence 

A time of confidences 

Long ago it must be 

I have a photograph 

Preserve your memories 

They're all that's left you. 

Simon & Garfunkel 






The beauty of the world has two edges, 
one of laughter, one of anguish, 
cutting the heart asunder. 
Virginia Woolf 
A Room of One's Own 



I left the room with silent dignity, 
but caught my foot in the mat. 

George and Weedon Grossmith 




"Are you going to tell me to 
get married and have parakeets?' 
Jerry — The Zoo Story 



My life will be sour grapes 
and ashes without you. 

Daisy Ashford 



Wandering around in my feelings 
So many ties to my heart 
So many things I care for 
So many left behind. 

Chris Williamson 



ANDREW BRODERICK BARR 



157 




Sometimes we are inclined 
to class those who are 
once-and-a-half-witted 
with the half-witted, because 
we appreciate only a 
third part of his wit. 
Thoreau 

One should stay 
where one is happy. 
A. Wolpert 

Say what you have to say, 
not what you ought, 
Thoreau 

Nobody's right if 
everyone's wrong . . . 



JAMES MICHAEL BLOCK 

I'm not alone . . . 
I'm with myself. 
M.E.W. 

Tears and fears and feeling proud, 
To say "I love you" right out loud. 

Field's and dreams and circus crowds, 
I've looked at life that way. 

But now old friends are acting strange, 
They shake their heads, they say I've changed. 

Well something's lost, but something's gained, 
In living every day. 

I've looked at life from both sides now, 
From give and take, and still somehow, 

It's life's illusions I recall, 
I really don't know life at all. 

Joni Mitchell 

Unconsciously, perhaps, we treasure the power 

we 

have over people by their regard for our opinion 

of 

them, and we hate those upon whom we have 

no such 

influence. — W. Somerset Maugham 

Experience is the name we give to our mistakes. 

Oscar Wilde 

Things do not change; we change. 
Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. 

Thoreau 




OOoO! IT'S GOT ME! ITS 

SQUEEZING ME TO DEATH !!, 
ICAN'TBeEATHE!AAK! 





ALAN RICHARD BLUMBERG 



SATIS VERBORUM 

1 ¥T%4i 




159 



CHRIS BOROS 




160 




Now this is not the 
end. It is not even the 
beginning of the end. 
But it is, perhaps, 
the end of the beginning. 
Winston Churchill 

I don't think more 
than a few bars ahead. 
Mick Jagger 



In life, everyone has 
his own opinion. — MWB 




MICHAEL WILLIAM BRANSFIELD 




When you finish up 
by winning, you're 
glad. Not for the 
money, but for the 
feeling. 
Walter Payton 



Stay calm and enjoy life. 
Mac McCarty 

Earickl/Gilda/The Band/ 
Tokyo/Lund-Nup-Beak-Laz/ 



161 




- 



SARAH CURTISS BRITT 




EVE RACHEL BROOKS 

Everything has its beauty, 
but not everyone sees it. 



Romance at short 
notice was her 
specialty. 

All day she sits 
upon the stair 
or on the steps or 
on the mat; she 
sits and sits and 
sits — and that's 
what makes a 
Gumbie cat! 






V 




■ 





Life is made up of moments. 
My "Catcher in the Rye" 






This page is 
dedicated to 
my family who 
gave me the 
privilege of 
choice. 
Without them, 
I would never 
have had 
the North Shore 
experience. 



163 




Easy-to know 

that diamonds — are precious 
good-to learn 
that rubies— have depth 
but more — to see 
that pebbles — are miraculous 
— Josef Albers 



victoria 

anne 

carson 




O H O 



CHRISTOPHER JON CHARNAS 



Now what I have thought, said Aurthur, 
is this. Why can't you harness Might 
so that it works for right? 
The might is there, in the bad half of people, 
and you can't neglect it. You can't cut 
it out, but you might be able to direct it, 
so that it was useful instead of bad. 

T.H. White 



Some men choose to see things 
as they are and ask, why? 
I choose to see things that 
are not and ask, why not? 

Robert F. Kennedy 




The work goes on, the cause endures, 
and the dreams shall never die. 
Ted Kennedy 



Shane 



Pilots 



Let the word go forth from this time and place, 

to friend and foe alike, that the torch has 

passed 

to a new generation of Americans. — born in this 

century, 

tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and 

bitter peace, 

proud of our ancient heritage . . . 

John F. Kennedy 



Charnette— J.D. 



"Such a test" — Jon Schwarz 



I do one thing at a time, 
I do it very well, and then I move on. 
Mash. Charles Emerson Winchester 









•,. -!i it. 1 .IB ■ ,- , :::,. 



■» -!k jttJMP 




Now you know that I care, 
for you. 

And I know that you care 
for me too. 

And we will zig-zag away, 
through the bottom of pain, 
occasionally glancing up 
through the rain, 
but everyone knows, 
a dog needs a home, 
for shelter, 

from pigs on the way. 
Pink Floyd 



We shall fight 

on the seas and oceans, 

in the cities, in the country, 

and on the beaches. 

We shall defend our island, 

whatever the cost may be, 

we shall never surrender! 

Winston Churchill 



All you touch, and all you see, 
— is all your life will ever be. 
Run, Rabbit, run. 

Pink Floyd 



All that is now, 

and all that is gone, 

All that's to come, 

and everything under the 

sun is in you, 

but the sun is eclipsed by 

the moon. 




ERIC CHASSIN 



166 



SHARON WOOTTEN COOPER 



I close my eyes I go far away 
away from this battlefield 
in my dreams well here I will enjoy it. 
Where innocence plays with all the laughing children 
the kind who are crying right now. 
A taste of freedom from the pain 
of everything here I see 
life is sweet but I took it all for granted 
and now I don't know if I could even tell you 
just what we permit, we allow. 

Kansas 




Goodbye's too good a word babe, 
so I'll just say fare thee well. 

Bob Dylan 





BUDGE 



N.F. Woman 



To do is to be — Rousseau 
To be is to do — Sartre 
Dobedobedobedo — Sinatra 

Everyone I know, everywhere I go, 
People need some reason to believe. 
I don't know about anyone but me. 
If it takes all night, that'll be alright. 
If I can get you to smile before I leave. 
Jackson Browne 



Twin sisters of different mothers 

Ann J. Figge 

've got my mother's eyes and my 
father's hair 

Does anybody really care? 
It's gettin' cold out here. 
Bette Midler 




167 




You mixed it, 
You drink it, 
Toyota! 



Fa Fa alias Irving 



"Lois, speak American.' 




The Great Onion Dip Wars 
1,11,111 —B.C. & J.D. 



JANE ELIZABETH DETTMERS 



If you want to sing out, sing out. 
If you want to be free, be free. 
'Cause there's a million things to be. 
You know that there are. 




I've got a dog, 
his name is Jelly 



Okely-dokely — Eric 



We're history 



DAVID M. DE WOSKIN 

When the clock says It's time to go 

Will you be able to conceive 

How it will be 

When you leave? 

Will It be the same 

As when you came? 

Here, 

Where I grimmed life 

Day by Day 

The future was uncertain 

The End 

Always near 

Can you conceive 

How it will be, 

When you leave. — D.D. 

Lying there, not hearing a sound, 
Except for your warm heart's pound. 
Wrapped in your arms is the only way, 
The rest of my life, I want to stay. — S.A.C. 

And if I say to you tomorrow 
Take my hand child come live with me 
It's to a castle I will take you 
And what's to be they say will be 
Page — Plant — Jones 

S.C. in '84 




169 




KATHERINE FERNSTROM 



i 




■i«.»Jilij<i'iJW '' M;;^M/ l »i«jj i ii)iJ2i)iij i Jf i , i):;ii;.:> l , 





Ciao e buona fortuna per tutti 




Fine be that way! 



Now I will believe 
that there are unicorns. 

— The Tempest 



170 




Somebody said that it couldn't be done, 

But he witha chuckle replied 
That "maybe it couldn't," but he would be one 

Who wouldn't say so till he'd tried. 
So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin 

On his face. If he worried he hid it. 
He started to sing as he tackled the thing 

That couldn't be done, and he did it. 





Isn't it strange 

That princes and kings, 

And clowns that caper 

In sawdust rings, 

And common people 

Like you and me 

Are builders for eternity? 

Each is given a bag of tools, 
A shapeless mass, 
A book of rules; 
And each must make — 
Ere life is flown — 
A stumbling block 
Or a steppingstone. 
R.L. Sharpe 



A pox on all steps 
but great ones. 



Bosh, choked Dan 



Chronic Bond 



IAN FLINT 



171 




Y 
A 
S 
M 
I 
N 

G 
H 
A 
Z 
I 



Many people wander up the hills from all around you. 
Making up your memories and thinking they have found you 
The embroidery of your life holds you in and keeps you out 

but you survive, 
Imprisoned in your bones behind the icing glass windows 

of your eyes. 

Judy Collins (Albatross) 



Oh, I miss my lovely mother 
And I love my lonely father 
I know I owe my brothers 
One thing and another 
I hear my sister sing 
I ought to be on my way by now 
James Taylor (Terra Nova) 



Come pick me up, I'm 

going down like a falling 

star. 

Karla Bonoff 

Oh, are you Seaman? — 
B.C. 



172 



And how many signs in 
heaven and earth do 
they pass by with their 
eyes averted? 
XII: 105 Quran 






We will dance 
to the music 
of a Last 

some stunning yet 
immemorable Last 
Lise 

She looked all about her; 
she listened a little; then she 
put her hand on the latch. 
She had not known where 
to turn; but she knew now. 
There was a very straight 
path. — H. James 




( W 1 

I Restaurants J 



Silver Jasmine 





Jeremy or John at 831-3191 or 831-3172 

Regular customers receive discounts 
on snow plowing and related services 



NOTICE TO APPEAR-COPY OF COMPLAINT 

You o<J-4*ktf -o'.f.ed to oppeor before the Circuit Court ot Cook County (Mumeipo 



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AM. 



NAOMI ELIZABETH 
GOLDEN 




Only the young die good. H.F., E.R. with E.L. 

Can't have a party without Beatles' records . . . 
— Eric Burdon 

... Or Mick and the Boys. Les, Har, El and Shawn 





Pups! L.G & S.IVU 







The spendor of a sunrise 
The dazzle of a flame 
The glory of a rainbow 
I'd put 'em all to shame 
And should this sunlit world 
Grow dark one day 
The colors of my life 
Will leave a shining light 
To show the way. 
Barnum 



Looks like we made it! — Will Jennings 

To everyone, 
especially 
M,D,H,D,E, &L: 

I love you 

Not only for what you are 
But for what I am 
When I am with you. 
I love you 

Because you have done 
More than any creed 
Could have done 
And more than any fate 
Could have done 
To make me happy. 
R.C. 



You only live once — but if you live right, once is enough! 

— Joe E. Lewis 



It hurts to say goodbye 
but it's time for me to fly. 



— REO 



J FSI IF. JOY. GORDON 



175 




PELLE HARBURY 



MURPH 



I'm a lonely lighthouse 

Not a ship out in the night 

Watching the sea . . . 

There is a shipwreck lying at my feet 

Some weary refugee from the rolling deep 

Ah, could you lose it all and fall for me ... ? 

Like to shine like the sun 

for one more summer day 

Shine like a lighthouse 

for one last summer night 

Flashing, flashing, fading away . . . 

James Taylor 



"Listen, I bought you a record," I told her. 
"Only | broke it on the way home ..." 

"Gimme the pieces," she said. "I'm 
saving them." 

Holden and Phoebe 



The worst thing that being an artist could do 
to you would be that it would make you 
slightly unhappy constantly. However, this 
is not a tragic situation, in my opinion. 

Jean De Daumier Smith 
(J.D. Salinger) 



But Mary kept all these things, 
pondering them in her heart. 

Luke 2:19 




MARTHA WHITING HENDERSON 





DAVID A. HOWLAND 



When elephants fight, it is the grass 
that suffers. 

African proverb 




A mistake proves that someone 
stopped talking long enough to 
do something. 

L.A. Times 



'Human Eraser" Pete Karmin 



Could we see when and where 
we are to meet again, we would 
be more tender when we bid our 
friends good-bye. 
Ouida 




'Oh, Geez." — Mac 



Renegades 



"GO RAIDERS!!! 




"Welcome to America!' 




Though he may devise a 

multitude of distractions, 

no man can long avoid himself. 



LOIS HUSTWAYTE 



Blondes have more fun 
Rod Stewart 



Enthusiasm is the key 
not only to the achieve- 
ment of great things, 
but to the accomplishment 
of anything that is 
worthwhile. 

Samuel Goldwyn 



What a woman wants is a strong, infelxible man 
that she can wrap around her little finger. 

Anon 



179 




LILA PATTERSON HUTCHINS 



Wumpchi 



Vsh 



"Hi, Don!" 

Huh?— D.A. 

What?— D.A. 

"Li" 



Everything is funny as 
long as it is happening 
to someone else. 

Will Rogers 




Thanks; M & D,J,C. 



180 



The work of the world doesn't 
wait to be done by perfect people. 



Poetry and Hums aren't things which 
you get; they're things which get 
you. And all you can do is to 
go where they can find you. 
Winnie the Pooh 



Religion is the process 
of finding our inner strength. 
Tolbert McCarrol 



CAROL DELORES JANSON 





We dance around in 
a ring and suppose, 
but the secret sits 
in the middle and knows. 
R. Frost 



This time, like all times, is 
a very good one if we but 
know what to do with it. 
Emerson 



181 




Good fellows are a dime a dozen, 
but an aggressive leader is priceless! 



The only reason I don't like playing 
in the World Series is I can't watch 
myself play. — Reggie Jackson 



Winning 
isn't 

everything, 
it's the 
only 
thing. 
Vince Lombardi 



You're never out of it 
till you're out of it. 
Yogi Berra 



When you're a professional, 
you come back, no matter what 
happened the day before. 
Bil'y Martin 



The difficult we do 
immediately; the 
impossible 
takes a little longer. 
Ray Kroc 



The Future is Now. — 
George Allen 



PETER KARMIN 




182 



JAMES DOUGLAS KNUPP 





Charney, if I've told you once, 
I've told you a thousand times . . . 
You are always getting us into trouble 



Poker, I don't even know her. 
I tell ya! 



Don't judge a man by the length 
of his hair. — Beak 



There is nothing worse than 
a missed opportunity 

Woody Allen 



It's better to be silent and thought 
a fool than to open your mouth 
and remove all doubt. 



Lund-yo, Beak-yo, Nup-yo, Laz-yo 



183 




JOHN T. KROHN 



The end of a matter is better than 

its beginning, 
And patience is better than pride. 
Do not be quickly provoked in 

your spirit, 
For anger resides in the laps of fools. 

Ecclesiastes 7:8-9 



TO DIONNE: 

"Tl" "THTHTHTH" 

"Hey, Bony!" 

"Hey, Dionne!" 
(By the way, my best seller, 
The Krohn Luck, 
will be on the shelves by 1985.) 



TO BLOCKHEAD: Don't turn into 
a Georgia Cracker. 



TO IONIC BOND (Brother Space): The 
dumbest genius I've ever met. 



TO AL: "You unlucky dog." "Krohn, it's 
gonna be tails; I know it!" 



TO THE YO'S (BLEAK, TUNA, 8c KNUPPER): 

May you all one day shave your heads and 

become Hare Krishnas at O'Hare Airport. 



TO PWEE, THE DROOLER: May you control 
yourself enough one day so as to not say "I'm 
so abused" again. 



TO CHARNEY or CHARNET: The original SPACE 
who taught me everything I know on the subject 




As you have done, 
it will be done 

to you; 
Your deeds will return 
upon your own head. 

Obadiah 1:17 



If a care is too small 
to turn into a prayer, 
it is too small to turn 
into a burden. 

Unknown 



184 



Now the seas is a vast accessible wasteland; 
an infinitude in which to hide our capfuls of 
tears. Tomorrow the sea will be the place 
to dive and swim, to flow timelessly 
and timelessly, to drown in pacific patience. 
Then again, the sea will still be the sea. 
And me? I will still be merely me. 



To live fully, we must learn to use things 
and love people, not love things and use 
people. 



In your arms, I feel so safe 

and so secure. 
Everyday is such a perfect 
day to spend all alone with you. 
Genesis 



Blessed are the meek, 
for they shall inherit 
the earth. 

Matthew 5:5 






Shower the people you love with love. 

James Taylor 



The rose— Megacrabobitchcawilthang 



CAROLINE TURNER KULLBERG 






<*te. 




185 





Binge in gig minfer 
^oye thd neighbor 



% ♦ 



You play 
like you 
practice 

Pop 
Warner 




EEE-OOO's #1, 

#2,#3, and #4 



I was reminded 
that when we 
lose and I strike 
out, a billion 
people in China 
don't care. 
Reggie Jackson 




Okely-Dokely 
J.D. & E.L. 




Christmas you promised. 
E.L. 



It's a club not a gang, gang 

live on 

Bad part of town. 

R.S., A.B., E.L. 



ERIC 

NEIL 

LUNDING 



186 



SHAWN 

LEE 
MC KEON 



No party is complete 

without Mick and the 

boys! 

Shawn, Har, Les, and El 



In order to be comfortable in another's presence 
you must first be comfortable with yourself. 





187 



TODD MILLER 



A wonderful fact to 
reflect upon, that every 
human creature is 
constituted to be that 
profound secret and 
mystery to every other. 

Charles Dickens 




188 




Think before you speak. 



There is great skill 
in knowing how to 
conceal one's skill. 



He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches. 



JOHN MARTIN PARK 





MARC E. PETERS 



No pain, no gain 
Spaz or KSBC 



Too many women, 
Too little time. 
Marc and Don 



forsan et heac olim meminisse invabil. 

Renid 



Oh, Geez, you're going to make 
stars out of them! 

Mac 



Moose, Molson, and 
Beck (clear bottle) 
Petes & Klob 



"lover himself 



Dognuts 

Booby 

Boss 




Thanks, Mom and Dad, for everything 

Love, Marc 



190 



LISA JANICE PURZh 




191 




ALISON LEIGH ROSEN 



Rose(n) is a Rose(n) is a Rose(n) is a Rose(n) 

Gertrude Stein 



Trois allumettes une a une allumees dans la nuit, 

La premiere pour voir ton visage tout entier, 

La seconde pour voir tes yeux, 

La derniere pour voir ta bouche, 

Et I'obscurite tout entiere pour me rappeler tout cela 

En te serrant dans mes bras. 

Jacques Prevert 



Non scholae sed vitae discimum — Seneca 




M 



fl 



Omnia praeclara rara — Cicero 






La vie en rose(n) 



i 



ROSEY 



°Nathan schwarz 



Nothing benefits learning more than being 
with the right people. 

Hsun-tzu 




. . . Born with a gift 
of laughter and a sense 
that the world is mad. 
Rafael Sabatini 



So before we end 
(and then begin) 
We'll drink a toast to 
How it's been . . . 
I've loved these days. 
Billy Joel 



wmiw 

KA1H.',. WHAT'S 

kkih?/ 



ITS AU.-TO0 WISHY-WASHY TO 

cm. wrm . is it nothingness.? 

HEAVEN ? THE HINPU5 BELIEVE 

•me tuimecm urn. OF ONE'S 

WORTN. UFE PETEmiNfiS OWE "5 
RE/NCARNfflEP 



WHK? \f i Pie 





Upside-down I am thinking. Thinking 
I am upside-down. If it were not 
that I were thinking, I would not 
be upside down. 



If I never see you again when the 
summer is gone and the days are gone; 
and though we may never cross paths 
again, I still think of you all my life. 






CHRISTOPHER SELINE 



Es gab Einen der ein Messer nahm 
Der Zweite waehlte Stacheldraht 
Ein Drifter beguenstigte den 

Rasierapparat 
Drei Leute versuchten 
Andere waren erfolgreich 
Fuer Diese der Ausweg war 
Ueber dem Strom 
Dein Ausgang war finsterer 
als meiner 



Although I've cast my net both far and wide 
The fish I have not caught still irk my pride 
And to my day of death I shall regret 
The rainbowed beings that escaped my net. 



Joy, shipmate, Joy! 
Our life is closed, 
our life begins, 
The long, long 
anchorage we leave, 
The ship is clear 
at last, she leaps! 
She swiftly courses 
from the shore, 
Joy, shipmate, joy! 
Walt Whitman 



Beautiful dreamer, 

wake unto me, 

Starlight 

and dewdrop 

are waiting 

for thee; Sounds 

of the rude world 

heard in the day, 

Lulled 

by the moonlight 

have all passed away. 
Stephen Collins Foster 
— Beautiful Dreamer 




Voices leaking 
from a sad cafe. 
Smiling faces 
try to understand; 
I saw a shadow touch 
a shadow's hand 
on Bleecker Street. 



194 



I believe in nature. 

I also believe in science and its progress. 

What WE have to do is make them work 

together. 

WE: the new generation, which, helped by the 

not so new, 

can change and improve the world. 



I can't conceive 
the nucleus of all 
begins inside 
a tiny seed 
and what we see 
as insignificant 
provides the purest 
air we breathe. 
Tree, you are 
the longest living thing. 
Stevie Wonder 




People of the North Shore: 
You are lukcy to live 
in such a wonderful 
place. In Spain, there 
isn't so much grass 
and green. 



GONZALO SENTMENAT 






REED CHARLES SNYDER 

I will follow you; 
will you follow me? 
Genesis 

Li, Patty/Bubble Gum, Brownie/Scrumptious/ 

BRRRUMBA/Flint & Stone/This & That/Boob- 

Toobing 

I Love You!/D.B./Perdue/Boops/Hey, Fig/Daisy/ 

Hey, Chill/Hey, Bro/Alfin Alan/Where Do You 

Change Your Schwarz?/T-Man/Spazlopolus/ 

Bubbachubs/Tiny Mighty Moe/Hey, 

Runts/Charnette/ 

Jen-Jen, Jen- Jen- Jen/Hey, B.G.I/Laz/ 

Hey, Paul— Hey, Rod(Bert)/"What are ya, some 

kinda crazy?"/ 

Bert & Jim— RIPPPI/P.R.C.O.P.B./ 

Bubba/Savabe/Pi-Pi/Yummers! 1 1 



Hey, Way to go, Guys!" (WYMCI) 






People think we dress alike to segregate indentities 
Pills or drink or puffing pipes in integrated entities 
Then they wink and snort their line and say how great their Bentley is 
They feel so warm when they conform 
Pete Townshend 



JASON GRANT SMITH 




Mama always told me not to look 
into the sights of the sun 

Oh, but mama, that's where 
the fun is 

Bruce Springsteen 



197 




EMILY SUSAN WANBERG 



The first days are the hardest days, so don't you worry 
any more. 

Cause when life looks like easy street, there is danger at 
your door. 

The Grateful Dead 



It is only with the heart that one can see rightly, 
What is essential is invisible to the eye. 

Antoine de Saint Exupery 



The things from North Shore that I will never forget: 
my bros, Lake Louise, The Big Park, I'm so abused, 
Hey Bunky, Fifi, Emu Pwee, Plan AB, my dog Kidney, 
'scuse me, and all those wild times I had with those 
Raiders! 



Gloom is a useless emotion. 

Bertie 




198 





— Well, I used to be disgusted, 
but now I try to be amused. 
— Elvis Costello 

If you just put your hand in mine, we're 
gonna leave all our troubles behind, 
going to walk and don't look back — 
keep on walking — 

Places behind you there to remind you- 
— Mick Jagger and Peter Tosh 



There been good times, there been bad 
times, I've had my share of hard times, 
too. Remember the good times we've had 
together — don't you want them back 
again? 

— Mick and Keith 



a 
1 

y 

s 



n 



w 
1 
r 

t 
z 



199 




ANDREW WOLPERT 



And so it is with our past. It is a labour in vain to attempt to 
capture it: all the efforts of our intellect must prove futile. The past 
is hidden somehwere outside the realm, beyond the reach of 
intellect, in some material object (in the sensation which that 
material object will give us) of which we have no inkling. And it 
depends on chance whether or not we come upon this object 
before ourselves must die. 

Marcel Proust 




Ah, but a man's reach should exceed 
his grasp, Or what's heaven for? 

Robert Browning 



If we shadows have offended, 
Think but this and all is mended, 
That you have but slumber'd here 
While these visions did appear. 
And this weak and idle theme, 
No more yielding but a dream . . . 
William Shakespeare 



When the world is running down 
you make the best of what's still 



The Police 




200 




■ mm. ■• • 




It would be inappropriate to close 
this book without lapsing into a brief 
moment of sentimentality. After 
working on the yearbook, the 
editors feel a new attachment to 
North Shore and its students, espec- 
ially the seniors. It is this class of 
1983 that gave us the inspiration, 
and the ultimatum, to finish this 
book on time (A "fall yearbook" is 
one North Shore "tradition" we 
would all like to see changed!). The 
1982-83 Mirror is our gift to you. 

The Editors 



201 




Quote of the Day: when you 
part from your friend, you 
grieve not; For that which you 
love most in him may be 
clearer in his absence, as the 
mountain to the climber is 
clearer from the plain. 

— Kahlil Gibran 




202 







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203 



BASKETBALL FORMALS 

Yes, friends, the shots you've all been waiting for! 



Front: Max Fisher, Michael Lickerman, J. P. Hamm, 
Howard Statland, Colin Davis, Peter Geyer, Thomas Smith, 
David Geist, Stuart Rosenwald, Frankie Ai, Max Voegler, 
Atticus Missner 




Front: Joel de la fuente, David Pascal, Cappy Peruchini, 
Taka Nikaidoh, Evan Schoter, Joel Jacobson, Billy Bach, 
Brendan Hasenstab, Fred Scott, Paul Dionne, Chris Avery, 
Andrew Brown, J.B. Opdycke, John Paul Zdon, Jay 
LaMarca, Larry Williams 




Front: Lori Horton, Libby Peruchini, Kristen Lawson, Dina 
Healy, Elizabeth O'Hara, Eden Hall, Katie Fink, Cindy 
Robinson, Hilary Mills, Nikki Demetriou, Jennifer Schechter, 
Molly Shotwell, Lisa McClung, Christine Griffin 



204 





1st: M. Griffin, C. Aggens, T. Bach, E. Wanberg, J. 
Dettmers, L. Wirtz 2nd: M. Conroy, S. Cooper, L. 
Hustwayte, M. Wing, C. Lincoln, H. Pollard, M. Lechter, 
Wainwright 




1st: P. Westhead, C. Olson, M. Reinsdorf, S. Murphy 2nd: 
M. McCarty, M. Bransfield, P. DeWoskin, S. Paige 



1st: J. Smith, P. Karmin, T. Snyder, D. Howland, M. Tyson 
2nd: J. Theiss, E. Lunding, C. Charnas, B. Fowler 3rd: J. 
Knupp, D. Brown, Coach Bach 



205 




CREATIVE CLASS ENCRAVINC 
MONOCRAMMINC 
STUDIO ART CLASS 
LIMITED EDITIONS 



LAPSYS CRYSTAL STUDIO 
558 GREEN BAY ROAD 
WINNETKA, ILL. 60093 
(312)441-5440 




Custom Framing 



Skilled 
Hands 
Of The 
Craftsman 



Richard Schnadig, M.F.A. 

PRINCETON FRAME 
& ART GALLERY, Ltd. 

1844 First Street 
Highland Park • 432-1930 




■■^^■■H 


CAMERA M 

f\ /) _L— * 





Congratulations 
and Best Wishes! 
from your friends at 
The Winnetka Bank 




441-4100 



Elm and Green Bay Road, Winnetka, Illinois 60093 
Member F.D.I.C. 



"Quality where it counts' 

Your photo-finishing will 
show it 

In at 9:00 am, 
Back at 4:00 pm 

589 Central 432-8550 
Highland Park IL 60035 



ltd. 



538 chestnut st. 
winnetka. il. 60093 
312/446-3626 



also located 

771 main SL 

lake geneva, wis. 53147 

414/248-4637 



206 



p U Good Luck I 
I Congratulations | 






Love from ^^J> k 

^Dacf, <jUom and L^feon ^| 4 



1 



Congratulations 
Class of 19S3 

fl I y II GRAPHIC 

704 SOUTH BOULEVARD 

liVAHSTON, ILLINOIS-60202 

(312)864-9375 



Eckart Hardware Co. 

735 Elm St. (East) 
Winnetka, III. 

Serving Winnetka Since 1915 

COMPLETE HARDWARE SERVICE 

Phone 446-0843 




i n n n i 




Serving friends and neighbors. 



G 



Glencoe National Bank. 



Mam Office 333 Park Avenue Northbrook Ortice 500 Skokie Blvd 

Glencoe II 60022 835 5400 Northbrook II 60062 291-0400 



1'a.r 



WC'Rt PftOvD OP ^OU, 

6A8Y PRA^oK 

best of LUCK-S.A.!!! 



Congrats, Class of '83! 




MADISON 



MILWAUKEE 



RACINE 



WAUKEGAN 



TODAY 



207 




^SfeJ^U"**, fir f'lSr^.i^* 





$£! 



•*" " 



>*: 



if 



The MIRROR staff wishes eac 
member of the class of '83 r 
fabulous future! (Can we com! 
1 >ut of the office now?) 



uffl% 





It's nice 
# to have 
First Federal 
nearby. 

For full financial service, 
visit our offices near you. 

Evanston: 801 Davis St. (Evanston Federal Division/Fountain Square), 869-3400 

2114 Central St., 869-0800 

Northbrook: 1825 Lake-Cook Rd., 564-9200 

Skokie: Old Orchard Rd. and Lavergne Ave., 674-4862 

Vernon Hills: 306 Hawthorne Center Mall, 367-7330 

Waukegan: 1438 N. Lewis Ave., 662-3060 

Winnetka: 814 Elm St., 441-5990 

Main Office: Dearborn and Madison, Chicago, 977-5000. 

And other convenient locations throughout Illinois. 




First Federal of Chicago 

ESEB 



t=J 



EQUAL HOUSING 
LENDER 



c 1982 First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Chicago Main Office Dearborn and Madison Chicago 
Member Federal Home Loan Bank and Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation 



209 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 
TURTLE WAX 

BEST OF LUCK! 




210 




FELL'S 



congratulations the class of '83 




GAPA 



Congratulations to the Wild Women 
of '83 



Nail Wrapping 
Eyebrows 
Pedicures 
Manicures 
Facials 
Complete line of: 
Skin Care 
Cosmetics 

SCULPTURED NAILS 

STUDENT RATE 

29.95 



2541 Prairie 
Evanston, IL. 
864-1606 



211 




Availlable at 



Saks Fifth Avenue Lord and Toylor I.Magnin 
Neiman Marcus Stanley Korshak Madeleine 




o. 



dm 



*s 



212 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS 

OF '83 

WITH EVERY GOOD WISH 

FOR THE FUTURE 

THE WOMAN'S BOARD 



THE WOMAN'S BOARD 

of 

THE NORTH SHORE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 

1982 — 1983 

President Mrs- Arthur M. Wirtz, Jr. 

First Vice President Mrs. Jack C. Bloedorn 

Second Vice President Mrs. Allen D. Rickel 

Third Vice President Mrs. Charles J. Henry 

Fourth Vice President Mrs. Clayton E. Whiting. Jr. 

Corresponding Secretary Mrs. Richard J. Krohn 

Recording Secretary Mrs. Jay D. Bach 

Treasurer Mrs. Mark G. McGrath 

Membership Chairman Mrs. Richard C. Cooper 



Mrs. Harold Beider 
Mrs. Mark Cohen 

Mrs. Roger S. Feldman 
Mrs. George Fink 

Mrs. Clinton Frank 

Mrs. Marshall D. Goldin 
Mrs. Alvin Gorman 

Mrs. Roger S. Griffin 

Mrs. Richard W. lanson 
Mrs. Leon Kogut 



Mrs. lohn A. Wing 



Mrs. Morton Lane 
Mrs. Everett Moffat 
Mrs. Nona Paul 
Mrs. Thomas C. Pettry 
Mrs. Alfred H.Shotwell III 
Mrs. Donald D. Slater 
Mrs. lohn Stepan 
Mrs. Edward T. Toyooka 
Mrs. R. Todd Vieregg 
Mrs. Klaus Voegler 



EX OFFICIO 



Mrs. Richard P Hall 



Mrs. William W. Talley 



SUSTAINING MEMBERS 



Mrs. E. Eugene Beisel 

Mrs. David A. Deuble 

Mrs. Richard I. Franke 
Mrs. John Furrer 

Mrs. John Gately 

Mrs. Harold H. Hines. Jr. 
Mrs. Kurt Karmin 



Mrs. John J, Louis, Jr. 
Mrs. Peter Perkins 
Mrs. Ralph N. Peters 
Mrs. lohn Puth 
Mrs. lohn B. Rodgers 
Mrs. James R. Schnering 
Mrs. Robert G. Weiss 



213 




in Winnetka . . 





and Hubbard Woods! 



First notional Bonk of Winnetko 

MAIN BANK. 520 GREENBAY ROAD HUBBARD WOODS FACI LITY 1070 GAGE ST. 



(312) 835-1 140 



Pork avenue 
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MIKE MORETTI 
OWNER 



329 PARK AVENUE 
GLENCOE. IL 60022 



2H 



Telephone: MOhawk 4-4474 



THE DETTMERS COMPANY 

Architectural Milhork 



W. L. DETTMERS, JR. 
President 



920-926 W. North Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 



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1722 Sherman Avenue 
Evanston, Illinois 60201 



(312)328-4666 



TRADITIONAL 
ATTIRE 
FOR MEN 
AND WOMEN 



congratulations 



D . hA . T. C . 




* 



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I rlemujacitkrers ')J -JJenparalea ana L ottcentralea <Z/ooas 

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215 




photo 

Ironies 
inc. 



740 Elm Street 
Winnetka 

THE PHOTOGRAPHY STORE 



PATRONS 

The Mirror would like to thank those 
who helped make this book possible: 

Iris Stattand. 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold J. Matthies. 

Kuecker Steamship Services, Inc., Chicago. 

Conney's Pharmacy, Winnetka. 

Mrs. Harold A. Beider. 

The Store, Winnetka. 

Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Schwarz 

Winnetka Travel, Winnetka. 

Carole-Beautiful Flowers, Winnetka. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen D. Rickel. 




216